Queen Elizabeth to honour UK health workers during the pandemic

LONDON – Britain’s Queen Elizabeth will recognise the work of hundreds of doctors, nurses, fundraisers and volunteers during the COVID pandemic when the her annual birthday honours list is published next month.

The list, which was due to be published in June, was postponed in order to add nominations for people playing key roles in the early months of the outbreak. It will be released on Oct. 10.

Britain has recorded the worst death toll in Europe and one of the worst economic contractions of any leading nation since the pandemic took hold in March.

Queen Elizabeth has made very few public appearances during that time but she has delivered a number of rallying messages to the nation and appeared in video conference calls with care workers and members of the military.

The honours have been awarded since Queen Victoria’s reign in the 19th century and aim to recognise not

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Queen’s Medical Centre midwives ‘overworked and understaffed’ before baby’s death

Midwives at Queen’s Medical Centre were overworked and understaffed before a before a baby died shortly after being born, an inquest has heard.

Wynter Sophia Andrews died at Queen’s Medical Centre on September 15 last year.

Her mother Sarah Andrews, a Nottingham City Council worker who now lives in Mansfield, says she felt “humiliated, worthless and forgotten” after arriving at the hospital.

Ms Andrews had started having contractions and experiencing pain six days before being admitted to the maternity ward on September 14.

Jo Taylor, a midwife at King’s Mill Hospital who had conducted a home visit, made the call to midwife Clare Lee at the hospital on Sarah’s behalf, the court heard.

Ms Lee said she hadn’t taken into consideration that the contractions had started days prior, which led to Ms Andrews being placed on a ward where she was only seen by midwives, and not clinicians.

A Healthcare

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Rich Economies Set to Recover More Quickly From Covid-19 Contractions

By Paul Hannon 

China and other rich countries will suffer less economic damage from the coronavirus pandemic than previously feared, according to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, but the global public health emergency will exact a higher toll on the economies of poor countries.

The Paris-based research body Wednesday said the global economy will contract less sharply this year than it thought likely in June, but warned that the recovery is set to slow from this month and remain vulnerable to fresh outbreaks. The OECD doesn’t expect a vaccine to be widely available until the end of next year.

“Momentum appears to be plateauing and confidence remains weak,” said Laurence Boone, the OECD’s chief economist.

In the latest of its quarterly reports on the global economy, the research body said it now expects the U.S. economy to shrink by 3.8% this year, having forecast a decline of 7.3%

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Rich Countries Set to Recover More Quickly From Covid-19 Contractions

By Paul Hannon 

China and other rich countries will suffer less economic damage from the coronavirus pandemic than previously feared, according to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, but the global public health emergency will exact a higher toll on the economies of poor countries.

The Paris-based research body Wednesday said the global economy will contract less sharply this year than it thought likely in June, but warned that the recovery is set to slow from this month and remain vulnerable to fresh outbreaks. The OECD doesn’t expect a vaccine to be widely available until the end of next year.

“Momentum appears to be plateauing and confidence remains weak,” said Laurence Boone, the OECD’s chief economist.

In the latest of its quarterly reports on the global economy, the research body said it now expects the U.S. economy to shrink by 3.8% this year, having forecast a decline of 7.3%

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MENA countries post sharp declines in export; sovereigns face borrowing pressure

Countries in the MENA region are experiencing some of the sharpest contractions in exports, and some sovereigns will face severe borrowing pressure in early 2021 due to economic shocks due to COVID-19, says Moody’s.

Investment-grade emerging market sovereign bond issuance climbed above $107 billion by the end of June, 53 percent higher than in the first six months of 2019, according to data from the global ratings agency.

The impact of COVID-19 has widened existing fiscal and external imbalances in emerging and frontier markets, the service said in a new research report.

Moody’s Sovereigns Global report said COVID-19 is exacerbating liquidity pressures which have caused severe stress or default for some sovereigns.

“We expect double-digit contractions in exports for emerging and frontier market economies in most regions in 2020,” said the report.

“The sharpest contraction will be in the Middle East and North Africa, among Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) oil

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Pregnant woman struggling with PTSD after miscarrying urges review of early labour restrictions

An expectant mother rallying after the trauma of miscarrying said she “feels forgotten about” after she was told her wife could not support her through the birth of their first child.

Chairis Grant-Hickey, a 38-year-old education officer, lost her first child conceived through fertility treatment, and has struggled with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and panic attacks since.

PTSD and pregnancy

The woman, who lives in South East London, experienced a miscarriage in October 2019. She fell pregnant for the second time in January.

“I had a missed miscarriage, meaning that I lost my first child at six weeks, but we didn’t find out until the nine week scan,” she said. “After the miscarriage I didn’t expect this level of anxiety. Every time I walk into a hospital, the memories of what happened just came flooding back,” she said. “I’ve still struggled with

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Pregnant Scots mum fears she may have lost baby after medics refused to examine her despite multiple miscarriages

A pregnant Scots mum who fears she may have lost her baby has hit out after doctors refused to examine her despite suffering multiple miscarriages.

Jodi Gray, who is more than 16 weeks pregnant, began having contractions on Tuesday afternoon and called the maternity unit at the Queen Elizabeth University Hospital.

The 25-year-old was told medics would not be able to see her in person because she was just days short of the 17 week cut off point.



Jodi is over 16 weeks into her pregnancy and is carrying a little girl


© Supplied
Jodi is over 16 weeks into her pregnancy and is carrying a little girl

But after she began to experience bleeding, Jodi drove herself to A&E while her anxious husband Ally, 27, waited at their Govan home in Glasgow, with their two young daughters.

Despite being put into a cubicle and dressed in a gown, the mum-of-two was told she would have to go home despite not knowing if her

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Riddle Me This: What Looks Like A ‘V’ But Feels Like A ‘U’?

By Kevin Flanagan

Ah, remember the original Batman TV series? There was nothing like a good Riddler riddle for the dynamic duo. Well, the answer to my crack at it is pretty straightforward: the U.S. economy.

As I’ve blogged about before, there are a variety of economic indicators that have shown clear signs of a “V”-shaped recovery. The most noteworthy have been retail sales and various employment gauges, as well as both manufacturing and service-related survey activities. But the one everyone is waiting for is the measure for overall economic activity – real GDP.

After the end of 2019, the U.S. economy went straight into negative territory, as the pandemic-related shutdowns produced unprecedented contractions in activity. First up, Q1 2020 real GDP fell by -5.0%, and that was followed up by the unfathomable plunge of -31.7% in Q2. Most market participants have been of the mindset that this cratering of

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La Jolla Tide Pools meets Craftsman-style renovation

Own a piece of Old La Jolla, even if your money’s new.

Own a piece of Old La Jolla, even if your money’s new.

In the early 1900s, many outlying areas of San Diego were experiencing severe contractions following a speculation-fueled housing boom in the 1880s and early 1890s. At the time, areas such as La Jolla were so sparsely populated that no formal system of addresses had been adopted. Instead, most homes adopted the names of their owners, so the six-bedroom, six-bath home built in 1910 on what would eventually become the 400 block of Prospect Street was simply known as the Kline House.

In its early days, the Kline House operated as La Jolla Sanatorium, the community’s first hospital, with six beds providing services ranging from basic treatment to surgery.

In 1920, the 3660-square-foot home was moved from its original Prospect location to a quarter-acre lot at 438 Ravina, under the direction of Ellen Browning Scripps, a noted local journalist

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A Mid-South family recalls having their son only six months into pregnancy

MEMPHIS, Tenn. — The McCain family was very excited when they found out after seven years of marriage, they were expecting.

At the same time, they understood this would be a high-risk pregnancy. Nevertheless, they still saw it as a blessing.

Six months into the pregnancy, Stephania McCain began having contractions. Her son RJ was ready to make his entrance into the world, ahead of schedule.

Stephania said she was caught off guard.

“I was barely six months pregnant,” Stephania said. “I was like, what do you mean?”

Stephania had dilated three centimeters, and there was a tear in the amniotic sack, causing fluid to leak. Her doctors attempted to stop the contractions with no success, and four days later, RJ was born.

He was tiny.

“They were holding him like this,” Stephania said, showing the palms of her hands.

RJ’s doctors knew the best place for him would be

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