Genuinely quick kitchen fixes you can do yourself

Even if only a fraction of your kitchen cabinets are actual wood — perhaps just the doors (not the cabinet boxes) or drawer fronts, in part or in full — you may have noticed your kitchen reacting to the changing seasons. Maybe every summer, that one cabinet door starts sticking, or every winter, a gap appears between two doors.

Wood, as a natural product, expands and contracts as temperature and humidity change: This can translate to your cabinets changing by fractions of an inch as the weather fluctuates. What many kitchen users do not realize, though, is that many cabinets are designed to be adjusted through the year! To see if yours were, simply open a door. If there are multiple screws within the hinging hardware itself (beyond the required screws that attach the hinge to the door and the hinge to the cabinet box), try adjusting these additional screws

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Pandemic drives kitchen remodeling projects

People are “forced to be home” and are “sick of their kitchens,” said Alicia Molenaar, a designer and co-owner of Kitchen Fair in Willmar.

During the pandemic, Kitchen Fair has been swamped with requests from customers looking for a new look and ways to improve functionality and efficiency in their kitchens. “We are really busy,” Molenaar said.

While updating paint or adding a colorful backsplash can be handled by a weekend do-it-yourselfer, a kitchen makeover can benefit from a professional designer.

The process begins with taking measurements of an existing kitchen space and an interview with the homeowner to find out how they use their kitchen, how many people typically cook there at one time and what they want in terms of style and functionality.

Giving a kitchen a new look can be as simple as installing new hardware – where the trend is for larger handles that can fit

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How To Create a Kitchen With a Soul, According to Home Design Experts


Of all the rooms in the house, the kitchen may evoke the warmest emotions. After all, it’s here that people gather with family and friends, to share food and good company. It’s no wonder the kitchen is often called the heart of the home—and that it’s a key selling point, promising a great lifestyle.

But kitchens also run the risk of being cold and soulless. What’s the point in having top-notch appliances if no one actually wants to hang out and use them? Like food, a kitchen needs to have a certain depth—let’s call it soul.


“A kitchen with a soul is a unique space that provides comfort, warmth, and a sense of peace,” says Ron Woodson of Woodson & Rummerfield’s House

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