How To Help Your Sales Teams Avoid Work-From-Home Burnout

I am CSO of the Bridge Group, responsible for sales and customer success.

While there are a lot of good and positive things about remote working (especially avoiding lengthy commutes and traffic), there are also downsides that we’ve never had to deal with before. At first, working at home was kind of a nice change. Many sales reps who used to travel three out of every four weeks of the month could now spend more time with their families or have more time to themselves. However, as the work-from-home situation continues, many of them are starting to feel even more isolated because they are not used to being at home this much. They miss being on the road, spending time with their team and visiting with clients face to face. It’s been a real adjustment.

Here are some tips to help your sales team feel connected and avoid

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How to avoid the biggest HomeKit problems when setting up your smart home

As your smart home grows more complex, the points where you can run into trouble multiply. Here are some of the most common HomeKit and home automation problems you’ll run into, and how to avoid them.

Smart home products often don’t come with a warning label or troubleshooting guide, but it is essential to understand what problems could occur and how to solve them when they do. Troubleshooting a problem with a network-connected device may not be as easy as the initial setup, so it is essential to have as much information available as possible when something stops working.

What to do if a HomeKit device is not responding

This is one of the most common failures in a smart home. When operating multiple devices in a home or apartment the Home app shows the status of every device on the screen. When a connection becomes weak or lost

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Mistakes to avoid when upgrading a kitchen: Don’t get sucked into tempting, one-function items

Your household may have grown during the coronavirus pandemic as adult children who lost their jobs returned home. At the same time, your wallet may have become thinner during the economic fallout caused by the global health crisis.

Combine those factors and it’s easy to see that a study by the National Kitchen & Bath Association (NKBA) found that people want to improve their kitchen, especially with germ-avoiding, touchless technology, while adhering to a tight budget.

An overwhelming 99% of manufacturing, construction, design and retail businesses surveyed by the trade association said more consumers are requesting assistance with small-scale, DIY kitchen projects.

To reduce the risk of getting Covid-19, the survey found people want contact-less products with automatic sensors and antimicrobial surfaces as well as outdoor kitchens, where they can safely entertain while social distancing.

The pandemic also made people aware of the need to prepare for an emergency and

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How to Avoid the 5 Worst Kitchen Design Mistakes

ALL-WHITE kitchens that look like operating theaters aren’t all that inspiring or even practical. But the overcooked alternatives—kitchens featuring grease-accumulating ceramic roosters or cabinetry festooned with grape-leaf swags—can seem depressingly cluttered. “It’s a place for creating meals, not Versailles,” said New York architect Kevin Lichten.

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Homeowners should view their kitchens first as machines for preparing food, he advised. “Then slowly add luxury to make it sensually appealing”—and ideally inject personality of the right kind. We asked design pros like Mr. Lichten to share their biggest kitchen-decorating pet peeves, from oversize islands to mixed-material counters, and to recommend chic, functional fixes.

HANG ‘EM HIGH In a kitchen in Oklahoma City, Okla., the upper cabinets continue to the ceiling, avoiding a common design error: a dust-collecting gap between the top of the millwork and the ceiling.

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Home insurance pitfalls to avoid during hurricane season – Lifestyle – providencejournal.com

For homeowners in coastal states, the 2020 hurricane season could mean financial disaster. Named storms are rolling in at a record pace, with as many as 25 expected in the Atlantic this season — twice the average number. After battering the Louisiana coast in late August, Hurricane Laura alone may account for as much as $12 billion in insured losses.

Even if you think you’re prepared, you may discover that your homeowners insurance doesn’t fully cover damage from a hurricane. To make sure you’re protected, avoid these four costly pitfalls.

Skipping flood insurance

Flood insurance is optional, and only 15% of American households buy it, says Mark Friedlander, spokesperson for the Insurance Information Institute.

But when a hurricane or storm hits, flooding causes more residential losses than high winds, according to a 2019 report from the U.S. Congressional Budget Office. That means most homeowners, even those with hurricane or wind

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6 Common Decorating Mistakes And How To Avoid Them, According to Top Interior Designers

From Veranda

Many of us have been spending our spring and summer revamping our gardens, finally building out our dream home offices, and tackling other renovation projects we may have put off if we hadn’t been spending every moment inside these past months. Warren Shoulberg, a retail journalist and columnist for Business Of Home, says he is expecting the home furnishings industry to see a boost in the coming months as companies like Lowe’s and Home Depot did earlier this year.

Shoulberg explained during his panel at BOH‘s Future of Home virtual conference that when the housing market does well, ultimately the home furnishings business follows, and while home improvement stores feel this first, furnishings and decor companies are sure to follow suit in the next six to nine months. And if you spent even a few minutes at your local Home Depot this spring, you know there’s

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How to Avoid Common and Costly Renovation Mistakes

By Elizabeth Renter

Many of us are spending more time at home in 2020, which could mean having more time to take on home improvement projects. But home renovations aren’t just a way to fill time; you want the results to be worth the hard work. The key to any successful project lies in careful planning — including financial strategizing — long before the power tools come out.

Roughly 3 in 5 American homeowners (61%) have taken on home improvement projects since March 1, 2020, spending $6,438, on average, according to an August 18-20 NerdWallet survey conducted online by The Harris Poll among 1,414 homeowners.

Whether you’re outfitting your home with a new office or classroom, or taking on long-intended improvements such as painting or installing new flooring, here are five tips to help you make sure you’re heading into the right project, the right way.

1. Consider Return on

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How to avoid common and costly home renovation mistakes

Many of us are spending more time at home in 2020, which could mean having more time to take on home improvement projects. But home renovations aren’t just a way to fill time; you want the results to be worth the hard work. The key to any successful project lies in careful planning — including financial strategizing — long before the power tools come out.

Roughly 3 in 5 American homeowners (61%) have taken on home improvement projects since March 1, 2020, spending $6,438, on average, according to an August 18-20 NerdWallet survey conducted online by The Harris Poll among 1,414 homeowners.

Whether you’re outfitting your home with a new office or classroom, or taking on long-intended improvements such as painting or installing new flooring, here are five tips to help you make sure you’re heading into the right project, the right way.

1. Consider return on investment

Any project

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Avoid these 4 big home insurance mistakes

For homeowners in coastal states, the 2020 hurricane season could mean financial disaster. Named storms are rolling in at a record pace, with as many as 25 expected in the Atlantic this season — twice the average number. After battering the Louisiana coast in late August, Hurricane Laura alone may account for as much as $12 billion in insured losses.

Even if you think you’re prepared, you may discover that your homeowners insurance doesn’t fully cover damage from a hurricane. To make sure you’re protected, avoid these four costly pitfalls.

Skipping flood insurance

Flood insurance is optional, and only 15% of American households buy it, says Mark Friedlander, spokesperson for the Insurance Information Institute.

But when a hurricane or storm hits, flooding causes more residential losses than high winds, according to a 2019 report from the U.S. Congressional Budget Office. That means most homeowners, even those with hurricane or wind

Read More

6 ways to avoid costly home renovation mistakes

Many of us are spending more time at home in 2020, which could mean having more time to take on home improvement projects. But home renovations aren’t just a way to fill time; you want the results to be worth the hard work. The key to any successful project lies in careful planning — including financial strategizing — long before the power tools come out.

Roughly 3 in 5 American homeowners (61 percent) have taken on home improvement projects since March 1, spending $6,438, on average, according to an Aug. 18-20 NerdWallet survey conducted online by The Harris Poll among 1,414 homeowners.

Whether you’re outfitting your home with a new office or classroom, or taking on long-intended improvements such as painting or installing new flooring, here are six tips to help you make sure you’re heading into the right project, the right way.

1. Consider return on investment

Any project

Read More