Home working here to stay, say businesses



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More home working is likely to be a permanent fixture for a majority of businesses, according to a study.

A survey of just under 1,000 firms by the Institute of Directors (IoD) shows that 74% plan on maintaining the increase in home working.

More than half planned on reducing their long-term use of workplaces.

A smaller survey of bosses whose firms had already cut workplace use suggested 44% of them thought working from home was proving “more effective”.

“Remote working has been one of the most tangible impacts of coronavirus on the economy. For many, it could be here to stay,” said Roger Barker, director of policy at the IoD.

“Working from doesn’t work for everyone, and directors must be alive to the downsides. Managing teams remotely can prove far from straightforward, and directors must make sure they are going out of their way to support employees’

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Home working here to stay, study of businesses suggests

A woman working at home
A woman working at home

More home working is likely to be a permanent fixture for a majority of businesses, according to a study.

A survey of just under 1,000 firms by the Institute of Directors (IoD) shows that 74% plan on maintaining the increase in home working.

More than half planned on reducing their long-term use of workplaces.

A smaller survey of bosses whose firms had already cut workplace use suggested 44% of them thought working from home was proving “more effective”.

“Remote working has been one of the most tangible impacts of coronavirus on the economy. For many, it could be here to stay,” said Roger Barker, director of policy at the IoD.

“Working from doesn’t work for everyone, and directors must be alive to the downsides. Managing teams remotely can prove far from straightforward, and directors must make sure they are going out of their way to

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Businesses could face billions of dollars in lawsuits from employees who brought Covid-19 home to relatives

Businesses with Covid-19 outbreaks are facing an emerging legal threat from claims that workers brought coronavirus home and infected relatives, which one risk analysis firm said could cost employers billions of dollars.



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The daughter of Esperanza Ugalde of Illinois filed in August what lawyers believe is the first wrongful death “take home” lawsuit, alleging her mother died of Covid-19 that her father contracted at Aurora Packing Co’s meat processing plant.

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The cases borrow elements from “take home” asbestos litigation and avoid caps on liability for workplace injuries, exposing business to costly pain and suffering damages, even though the plaintiff never set foot on their premises.

“Businesses should be very concerned about these cases,” said labor and employment attorney Tom Gies of Crowell & Moring, which defends employers.

The lawsuit against Aurora alleges that Ricardo Ugalde worked “shoulder to shoulder” on the company’s processing

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Lowe’s, ‘Shark Tank’ star Daymond John launch effort for small businesses

As many small businesses face challenges during the coronavirus pandemic, Lowe’s is giving them a shot to get their products on its store shelves and website.

Lowe’s CEO Marvin Ellison said Tuesday on CNBC’s “Squawk on the Street” that the home improvement retailer is teaming up with Daymond John, a star of ABC’s “Shark Tank,” to mentor entrepreneurs across diverse backgrounds, listen to their pitches and narrow the pool to standouts. The initiative will ultimately culminate in a one-day pitch competition judged by Lowe’s executives and hosted by John.

“Although we’re a big company, we’re fortunate to be classified as an essential business, we understand that the success of our broader macro economy is going to be the small businesses and the ability for small businesses to continue to grow and thrive,” Ellison said. “We understand that Covid-19 has created an incredible strain on the economic viability of many of

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Lowe’s offers small businesses the “Shark Tank” treatment

NEW YORK (AP) — Lowe’s is offering small businesses, particularly those owned by minorities, the “Shark Tank” treatment.

The home improvement chain is teaming up with Daymond John, star of ABC’s “Shark Tank,” to give potential suppliers the chance to pitch their products to a Fortune 500 company.

That will allow a small number of entrepreneurs to pitch their products directly to Lowe’s, sidestepping a traditionally arduous process of getting their goods sold in 2,200 stores run by the Mooresville, North Carolina company, and on lowes.com.

From Tuesday through Sept. 25 small business owners can apply. Lowe’s is putting an emphasis on businesses run by the disabled, people of color and people in the LGBT community. Candidates will be narrowed down to 75, who will then be allowed to submit more in-depth pitches via video.

Five finalists will make a live virtual pitch, hosted by John, to Lowe’s CEO Marvin

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Stay-at-Home Orders More Effective on Virus Than Closing Businesses

(Bloomberg) — Shelter-in-place orders by U.S. state and local governments did more to combat the spread of the coronavirus than business closures while destroying fewer jobs, researchers at the University of Pennsylvania said in a new study released Wednesday.



a man sitting on a table: A person works from home in an arranged photograph taken in Princeton, Illinois, U.S., on Tuesday, Sept. 8, 2020. Coronavirus cases in the U.S. increased 0.4% as compared with the same time Monday to 6.32 million, according to data collected by Johns Hopkins University and Bloomberg News.


© Bloomberg
A person works from home in an arranged photograph taken in Princeton, Illinois, U.S., on Tuesday, Sept. 8, 2020. Coronavirus cases in the U.S. increased 0.4% as compared with the same time Monday to 6.32 million, according to data collected by Johns Hopkins University and Bloomberg News.

Interventions “that target individual behavior (such as stay-at-home orders) were more effective at reducing transmission at lower economic cost than those that target businesses,” economist Kent Smetters and analysts Alexander Arnon and John Ricco wrote.

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The paper is one of several being presented Thursday at a conference hosted by the Brookings Institution in Washington studying the impact of Covid-19 on

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More loan money available to rebuild Kenosha businesses

MADISON, Wis. (AP) — The state is making more money available to help small businesses in Kenosha recover from damage during recent unrest over the police shooting of Jacob Blake, officials announced Wednesday.

Gov. Tony Evers and the Wisconsin Economic Development Corporation said another $3 million would be added to the previously-announced $1 million in no-interest loans for small businesses.

Kenosha Fire Chief Charles Leipzig recently told the Police and Fire Commission that damage from the violence that followed Blake’s shooting Aug. 23 has topped $11 million.

The 29-year-old Black man was left partially paralyzed after a white officer shot him seven times in the back as police tried to arrest him.

The shooting, which was recorded on video and seen widely on social media, sparked protests and violence in Kenosha, where roughly two dozen fires were set and numerous businesses were destroyed.

Prosecutors say 17-year-old Kyle Rittenhouse of Antioch,

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Home sweet home: CNY bakers launch new businesses from their kitchens amidst pandemic

When the coronavirus pandemic kept people at home, navigating the unknown, four Central NY food entrepreneurs baked up new business ideas.

In lieu of food trucks, farmer’s markets, or opening a traditional storefront, these business owners opted to launch on social media first. Using Instagram and Facebook to market their products and connect with customers, they have each forged a path into the food business world despite the challenges of 2020.

These bakers and candy makers dealt with ingredient shortages due to the pandemic and space limitations, but each of them expressed wanting to do more for their communities and to make people happy during this tumultuous time.

We may be able to walk into their storefronts in the future, but here is how to try these homemade goods now.

Big Al’s Vegan Bakery

Big Al's Vegan Bakery

Alexis Barney, owner of Big Al’s Vegan Bakery started her business of vegan cakes and cookies

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