‘Don’t Be Afraid of Covid,’ He Insists

Donald Trump Takes Break from Treatment for Novel Coronavirus at Walter Reed Hospital for Unannounced Car Ride Around Facility

Criticism swirled in and around Walter Reed hospital on Sunday after President Donald Trump took a break from his treatment for the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) for an unannounced car ride around the facility to wave to some of his supporters outside

In an announcement that raised more questions than it answered, Donald Trump said Monday he planned to head back to the White House that night, about three days after first being hospitalized with the novel coronavirus (COVID-19).

“I will be leaving the great Walter Reed Medical Center today at 6:30 P.M.,” the president tweeted, touting what he called his administration’s progress on coronavirus treatments.

In a kind of willful rejection of his recent health problems and a pandemic that has killed more than 200,000 people in the U.S., he

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Want a second home during COVID? These Zillow vets have invented a radically less expensive way to buy one

There’s an old truism about vacation homes: Nature wants them back.



Austin Allison wearing a suit and tie: Pacasso's co-founder Austin Allison


© Courtesy of Pacaso
Pacasso’s co-founder Austin Allison

Indeed between the maintenance, upkeep, taxes, hassle of finding short-term renters, and typically small number of days per year homeowners are actually in residence, vacation homes are generally a great way to make memories—and a poor way to invest your money.

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Now two veterans of Zillow have a new spin on second homes—they want to pair you up with likeminded buyers to own just the amount of the house you’ll actually use. Their company, called Pacaso (pronounced like the painter), launched this week. Pacaso’s chairman is Zillow cofounder and former CEO Spencer Rascoff; its CEO is Dotloop founder and former Zillow executive Austin Allison. The company says it has raised $17 million in Series A funding, from investors including Maveron, Crosscut, Global Founders Capital, Howard Schultz, and other Zillow

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Lou Holtz: Improvements in COVID testing made it possible for Big Ten to play in 2020

This is a rush transcript from “The Story with Martha MacCallum” September 16, 2020. This copy may not be in its final form and may be updated.

MACCALLUM: All right, everybody, so tonight, we’re 48 days from the presidential election and now six months into the coronavirus. There’s a pitched battle over money for relief, vaccines and the divide over masks. The riots that have embroiled cities across this nation during racial strife and job loss due to the lockdown have now cost the country more than a billion dollars in those broken windows and buildings that we have seen burned over the course of the last few months, and that’s far from over. 

The country is fighting though to get back to normal as we await vaccines. 
The Big Ten announced today that they will reverse their earlier decision and they will play football after all at their colleges.

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Care Home Workers Suffer Covid Trauma, Anxiety: Study

As Covid-19 began its spread throughout Europe, northern regions of Italy — home to a high proportion of elderly people — were at the frontline


MARCO BERTORELLO

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Nearly half of care home workers in northern Italy may be suffering from post-traumatic stress or anxiety following the first wave of the pandemic, new research showed Wednesday.

As Covid-19 began its spread throughout Europe, northern regions of Italy — home to a high proportion of elderly people — were at the frontline as intensive care units were inundated with patients.

While much attention was focused on the physical health of first responders and doctors, far less study has been given over to the mental well-being of the nurses, cleaners and caterers at care homes.

Researchers in Italy and Britain conducted an anonymous survey of more than 1,000 care home workers to check their levels of stress and anxiety after months

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4 Ways COVID Has Changed Home Design

There’s no place like home. 

The phrase has always been true, but especially in the last six months. What used to be a place to return to after a long day now serves multiple purposes to people all day, every day. The home is now an office, school, restaurant, gym, playroom and more. 

And with most people around the world spending significantly more time in their homes than ever before, change has inevitably occurred. 

Spending so much time at home leaves people to look at their homes and want to make changes. Research has found that 70% of Americans have completed a home improvement project during the pandemic, with more projects planned for 2021. Consequently, sales and stock prices for companies like Home Depot, Lowe’s and Sherwin Williams have seen tremendous growth in recent months. 

Home design changes and improvements have long been linked to pandemics. In fact, the

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‘Take home’ lawsuits over COVID infections could be costly for U.S. employers

By Tom Hals



a group of people in a field: FILE PHOTO: American flags representing 200,000 lives lost due to coronavirus are placed on National Mall in Washington


© Reuters/JOSHUA ROBERTS
FILE PHOTO: American flags representing 200,000 lives lost due to coronavirus are placed on National Mall in Washington

(Reuters) – U.S. businesses with COVID-19 outbreaks are facing an emerging legal threat from claims that workers brought coronavirus home and infected relatives, which one risk analysis firm said could cost employers billions of dollars.

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The daughter of Esperanza Ugalde of Illinois filed in August what lawyers believe is the first wrongful death “take home” lawsuit, alleging her mother died of COVID-19 that her father contracted at Aurora Packing Co’s meat processing plant.

    The cases borrow elements from “take home” asbestos litigation and avoid caps on liability for workplace injuries, exposing business to costly pain and suffering damages, even though the plaintiff never set foot on their premises.

“Businesses should be very concerned about these cases,” said labor and employment attorney Tom Gies of

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UK wants students to be able to go home for Christmas despite COVID

LONDON (Reuters) – The British government wants university students to be able to return home for Christmas, culture minister Oliver Dowden said on Sunday, amid concerns that restrictions on movement may be needed to curb the rising number of coronavirus cases.

Outbreaks have forced some institutions to ask students – many of whom are far from home and paying thousands of pounds for accommodation and teaching – to self-isolate in their rooms and follow lectures online.

Health minister Matt Hancock had said on Thursday he could not rule out asking students to stay on campus over Christmas to prevent the virus from spreading.

“I very much want students to be able to go home at Christmas,” Dowden told Sky News.

“We’re three months away from Christmas. We’ve announced a range of measures. We are constantly keeping this situation under review.”

The government is facing disquiet from some of its own

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Ex-care home bosses charged over dozens of Covid deaths in Massachusetts

Massachusetts’ top law enforcement official has brought criminal charges against former leaders of a nursing home for military veterans, for allegedly making a fatal decision that led to the deaths of many dozens of elderly residents and staff.



a bench in a park: Photograph: Brian Snyder/Reuters


© Provided by The Guardian
Photograph: Brian Snyder/Reuters

Related: Dorm snitches and party bans: how universities around the world are tackling Covid

Former superintendent Bennett Walsh, 50, and Dr David Clinton, 71, were indicted last week on 10 criminal neglect charges each, according to state attorney general Maura Healey. The two have not been taken into custody and will be arraigned at a later date.

“We began this investigation on behalf of the families who lost loved ones under tragic circumstances and to honor these men who bravely served our country,” Healey said Friday. “We allege that the actions of these defendants during the Covid-19 outbreak at the facility put veterans

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76 vets die of Covid at soldiers home

They stormed the beaches at Normandy, liberated Nazi concentration camps and fought the Cold War in Korea and Vietnam only to die in their beds from a virus that infiltrated the veteran’s center in western Massachusetts that was their home.



a group of people in a park


© Provided by NBC News


But on Friday the loved ones of the 76 veterans who, starting in March, died from the coronavirus at the Holyoke Soldiers Home, received a measure of belated justice.

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Former Superintendent Bennett Walsh, a Marine, and the home’s ousted medical director, Dr. David Clinton, were each charged with five counts of “wantonly or recklessly” causing or permitting bodily harm and five counts of neglect or mistreatment of an older or disabled person, Massachusetts Attorney General Maura Healy announced.

“My heart goes out to the families that lost loved ones at the Holyoke Soldiers Home,” Healy said. “They risked their lives from Normandy to

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Moscow mayor urges more home-working as Russia’s new COVID cases hit three-month high

MOSCOW (Reuters) – The mayor of Moscow urged businesses on Friday to get more people to work from home as Russia’s daily tally of new coronavirus cases hit its highest since June 23.

FILE PHOTO: A security guard wearing a protective face mask looks on in Moscow, as Russia’s coronavirus case tally passed the one million September 1, 2020. REUTERS/Maxim Shemetov

Officials reported 7,212 new infections, bringing the national case total to 1,136,048. In Moscow, the tally of new cases rose almost 50% overnight to 1,560 from 1,050 the previous day.

Russia lifted many of its lockdown restrictions in June and many shops, businesses and public transport in the capital of more than 12.5 million people are operating largely as normal.

But on Friday Mayor Sergei Sobyanin recommended that the heads of all companies in the city switch as many of their staff as possible to working from home from

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