As COVID hits, Glenville couple adjusts renovation expectations

Categories: Fall Home

GLENVILLE — Ani and Zack Port were about to close on a house in Glenville when COVID moved in.

The couple was excited to find a home with more space for their growing family in a friendly neighborhood just blocks from Pashley Elementary School, where the two had met in fourth grade. The circa 1959 split-level needed some fixing up, but they were OK with that.

The closing was planned for the end of February. As the date approached, the Ports, who have a 2-year-old son and another child on the way, scrambled to get ready. They lined up a contractor to perform renovations, arranged for a place to stay while construction was underway and stashed stuff in storage.

Then, everything came to a screeching halt.

COVID-19-related restrictions turned their home-buying endeavor into a nonessential transaction. The closing was bumped to March. Then it was postponed again,

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COVID can’t stop home sales

The National Association of Realtors (NAR) issued a release Tuesday in which the association says that existing-home sales continued to climb in August, marking three consecutive months of positive sales gains.

The northeast part of the nation saw the greatest improvement from the prior month.

Total existing-home sales rose to a seasonally-adjusted annual rate of six million in August. Sales as a whole rose year-over-year, up 10.5 percent from a year ago, which totaled 5.43 million in August 2019.

The median existing-home price for all housing types in August was $310,600, up 11.4 percent from August 2019 ($278,800), as prices rose in every region. August’s national price increase marks 102 straight months of year-over-year gains.

Total housing inventory at the end of August totaled 1.49 million units, down 0.7 percent from July and down 18.6 percent from one year ago, from 1.83 million. Unsold inventory sits at a 3.0-month supply

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Kingfisher PLC profits go through the roof as COVID lockdown leads to home improvement boom

eCommerce sales represented 19% of group sales in the half-year compared to 7% a year earlier

() saw its profits and cash flow go through the ceiling in the first half of the year as demand for home improvement took off during the coronavirus (COVID-19)  lockdown.  

But while the group’s directors plan to repay UK furlough payments back to the government, provided another prolonged national lockdown is not forthcoming, there is no plan of reinstating the dividend yet. 

The DIY stores chain saw group sales fall by 1.3% to £5.9bn in the six months ended July 31, 2020, as like-for-like sales (LFL) dropped 1.6%, with growth at B&Q in the UK, along with the Poland and Romania businesses offset by declines in the UK’s Screwfix, both French chains, Russia, Spain and Portugal.

The second quarter from May onwards saw LFL sales rise 19.5%, with growth in all the group’s areas

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COVID ‘firepower’: Britain imposes six-month curbs against second wave

LONDON (Reuters) – British Prime Minister Boris Johnson told people on Tuesday to work from home where possible and ordered bars and restaurants to close early to tackle a fast-spreading second wave of COVID-19 with new restrictions lasting probably six months.

After scientific warnings that deaths could soar without urgent action, Johnson stopped short of another full lockdown as he did in March, but warned that further measures could come if the disease was not suppressed.

“We reserve the right to deploy greater firepower, with significantly greater restrictions,” he told parliament following emergency meetings with ministers and leaders of the United Kingdom’s devolved governments.

Just weeks after urging people to start returning to workplaces, Johnson advised office workers to stay at home if they could. He ordered all pubs, bars, restaurants and other hospitality sites to close at 10 p.m. from Thursday with only table

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COVID ‘Firepower’: Britain Imposes Six-Month Curbs Against Second Wave | World News

By Guy Faulconbridge and Kate Holton

LONDON (Reuters) – British Prime Minister Boris Johnson told people on Tuesday to work from home where possible and ordered bars and restaurants to close early to tackle a fast-spreading second wave of COVID-19 with new restrictions lasting probably six months.

After scientific warnings that deaths could soar without urgent action, Johnson stopped short of another full lockdown as he did in March, but warned that further measures could come if the disease was not suppressed.

“We reserve the right to deploy greater firepower, with significantly greater restrictions,” he told parliament following emergency meetings with ministers and leaders of the United Kingdom’s devolved governments.

Just weeks after urging people to start returning to workplaces, Johnson advised office workers to stay at home if they could. He ordered all pubs, bars, restaurants and other hospitality sites to close at 10 p.m. from Thursday with only

Read More