winners and losers in the COVID economy

Although European capitals are loath to reintroduce the national lockdowns imposed in March, they are targeting restrictions on hospitality, entertainment and travel.

“No government wants to go back to where they were in March given the impact on the economy,” said Melanie Debono, European economist at Capital Economics. “But any restrictions may take longer to unwind so the virus doesn’t uptick again.”

Where we have seen policies to contain the virus, people have quickly returned to normal.

Frederic Neumann, HSBC

By contrast, countries in the Asia-Pacific region – including New Zealand and Vietnam as well as Taiwan, South Korea and China – suppressed COVID-19 to lower levels and then maintained tighter controls against a resurgence. While Europe enjoyed its summer holidays, Asia kept international travel on hold.

Taiwan closed its borders early and followed that up with well-organised contact tracing, quarantine and social distancing to eliminate a few initial

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Australia to Expand First-Home Buyer Assistance to Lift Economy

(Bloomberg) — Australia will provide 10,000 extra places in a program to help first-home buyers and encourage construction as the economy recovers from the impact of the Covid-19 pandemic.



a sign on the side of a building: An advertisment for residential property is displayed on the fence of a show home at a new housing development in Melbourne, Australia, on Tuesday, Sept. 1, 2020. Australian house prices fell for a fourth consecutive month in August as a slump in the Melbourne market -- the center of a renewed Covid-19 outbreak -- weighed heavily on the national picture and expected higher unemployment continues to cloud the outlook.


© Bloomberg
An advertisment for residential property is displayed on the fence of a show home at a new housing development in Melbourne, Australia, on Tuesday, Sept. 1, 2020. Australian house prices fell for a fourth consecutive month in August as a slump in the Melbourne market — the center of a renewed Covid-19 outbreak — weighed heavily on the national picture and expected higher unemployment continues to cloud the outlook.

The First Home Loan Deposit Scheme will be expanded from Oct. 6 to support the purchase of a new or newly built home, Treasurer Josh Frydenberg said in a statement. About 20,000 people have already used the program, which allows them to purchase their first property with a deposit of

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How is Utah’s economy recovering? New Salt Lake Chamber tool tracks improvement

SALT LAKE CITY — In the early days of the coronavirus pandemic, government programs that were designed to aid businesses and citizens cast a wide net. While everyone was affected by the virus shutdowns, some felt the impact more than others and were left without the help they needed. The Salt Lake Chamber is hoping to better identify those markets.

“We’re smarter than we were back then, and so we know some of those relief efforts can be more targeted,” said Derek Miller, president and CEO of the Salt Lake Chamber and Downtown Alliance. “It gives us as a business community an opportunity to advocate at a local, state and even federal level for those kinds of programs.”

The Salt Lake Chamber’s Roadmap to Recovery Coalition and Kem C. Gardner Policy Institute announced a new economic tool Monday called the Road to Recovery Dashboard. The dashboard will be used to

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Did The Pandemic Destroy The World Economy As Much As We Think?

Did the pandemic destroy the world economy as much as we think. That depends on who you ask. Barclays Capital economists, led by Christian Keller, say no.

“The pandemic is not over, but (economic) activity data in recent months provided good news,” says Keller. “The growth contractions in the second quarter were typically less severe than feared and the subsequent recovery, at least in its initial phase, has surprised on the upside.”

This has been particularly true in the U.S. and in China, where the economy is on the upswing. China, in fact, is expected to register positive growth this year. It won’t be over 5%, as was expected. But it won’t be negative, either, assuming economies remain as is for

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