Microsoft Will Let Employees Work From Home Permanently

Microsoft will let its employees work from home permanently, even once the COVID-19 pandemic is over.

In an internal memo seen by The Verge that highlights the company’s plans to create a “hybrid workplace”, Microsoft said it will allow employees to work from home freely for less than 50% of their working week, but has said that managers will be able to approve permanent remote work if staff request it. Part-time working hours will also be available for employees with approval from their manager. 

Currently, the cast majority of the company’s employees are working from home, and Microsoft previously said they would not reopen office until at least January 2021. 

For those whose work can be done entirely remote, there are options to relocate

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Lowe’s gives $100 million more in bonuses to hourly employees

Shoppers wearing protective masks wait in line to enter a Lowe’s Cos. store in San Bruno, California, U.S., on Wednesday, May 20, 2020.

David Paul Morris | Bloomberg | Getty Images

Lowe’s said Wednesday it will give $100 million more in bonuses to hourly employees, as strong demand for home improvement continues.

It marks the sixth time the home improvement retailer has given additional pay to workers at its stores, distribution centers and support centers during the coronavirus pandemic. It gave bonuses to part-time, full-time and seasonal employees in March, May, July and August. It also increased pay by $2 an hour for the month of April. 

With the latest round, the home improvement retailer will have paid more than $675 million in additional pay to employees this year. It will pay the latest bonuses on Oct. 16. Full-time hourly employees will receive $300 and part-time and seasonal hourly employees

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75% of American Employees Say They Have Struggled with Anxiety Caused by COVID-19 and Other World Events While Working From Home

Ahead of World Mental Health Day, new survey reveals the state of employee wellness in workplaces country-wide

New survey findings indicate that 75% of U.S. employees have struggled at work due to anxiety caused by the COVID-19 pandemic and other recent world events. TELUS International, a leading global customer experience and digital solutions provider, commissioned a survey of 1,000 Americans who have been working for their employers from home since March, and found that nearly 80% of respondents said they would consider quitting their current position for a job that focused more on employee mental health.

“It’s imperative in today’s climate that employers are aware of and consider the difficult truth that many individuals are experiencing mental and physical health issues since they began working from home during the COVID-19 pandemic,” said Marilyn Tyfting, chief corporate officer of TELUS International. “Since March, we transitioned the majority of our almost

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How to Keep Your Employees Healthy While They’re Working From Home

At first, everybody was fine working remotely, says Melissa Afterman, an ergonomics consultant and environmental health and safety specialist at the University of California, San Francisco. But after about three months, she says, “I started getting a lot of phone calls.”

Since Covid-19 sent droves of office workers home, doctors and workplace safety experts have called attention to the risk of work-related injuries and health problems, from back pain to tooth fractures. Even as many remote employees have settled into a routine, it was only a matter of time before months of hunching over laptops–combined with the stress of living through a pandemic–started to take a toll on their health.

Forty-one percent of Americans have had new or increased back, neck, or shoulder pain since they began working from home, according to a survey commissioned by insurance company Chubb in May and June. And in a separate June survey of

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Federal survey allows employees to voice their concerns, enable improvements | Article

ROCK ISLAND ARSENAL, Ill. – With three weeks left, the push is on for federal civilians to take an online survey to gauge the workforce’s views on various topics to help leadership develop better policy changes.It’s called the Office of Personnel Management Federal Employee Viewpoint Survey.As of Sept. 25, two weeks into the open window to take the survey, the U.S. Army Sustainment Command had 7% of its employees participate. The minimum Army goal is 50%. For 2019, ASC had a participation rate of 48.8%.The 38-question survey, which is offered through Oct. 27 and takes about 20 – 30 minutes to complete, gives employees a high-visibility venue to voice their opinions about their workplace environment.“I genuinely ask for your participation so we gain a complete representation of how you feel ASC is doing,” stated Matt Sannito, deputy to the commanding general, ASC, in a recent organization-wide email.Although the annual survey

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What Twitter is doing to help employees keep working from home forever, from inventing to new lingo to using hand signals on video calls



a group of people walking down a street next to tall buildings: Twitter's headquarters in San Francisco. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images


© Provided by Business Insider
Twitter’s headquarters in San Francisco. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

  • Twitter has been working on “decentralizing” its workforce since 2018, including adding resources and policies to make life easier for remote workers. 
  • Some teams at Twitter have invented hand signals to help employees speak up during virtual meetings, while other teams have invented new phrases to get meetings back on track, according to the Washington Post. 
  • This has come in handy during the coronavirus outbreak: Twitter was the first major tech company to have its workforce start working from home, and CEO Jack Dorsey has told employees they may keep working remotely forever.
  • Twitter has since decided to sublease 100,000 square feet at its San Francisco headquarters and has a policy in place to cut pay for employees who move outside the Bay Area to a less expensive region. 
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Even

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Businesses could face billions of dollars in lawsuits from employees who brought Covid-19 home to relatives

Businesses with Covid-19 outbreaks are facing an emerging legal threat from claims that workers brought coronavirus home and infected relatives, which one risk analysis firm said could cost employers billions of dollars.



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The daughter of Esperanza Ugalde of Illinois filed in August what lawyers believe is the first wrongful death “take home” lawsuit, alleging her mother died of Covid-19 that her father contracted at Aurora Packing Co’s meat processing plant.

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The cases borrow elements from “take home” asbestos litigation and avoid caps on liability for workplace injuries, exposing business to costly pain and suffering damages, even though the plaintiff never set foot on their premises.

“Businesses should be very concerned about these cases,” said labor and employment attorney Tom Gies of Crowell & Moring, which defends employers.

The lawsuit against Aurora alleges that Ricardo Ugalde worked “shoulder to shoulder” on the company’s processing

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Google will try ‘hybrid’ work-from-home models, as most employees don’t want to come in every day

  • Most Google employees want to return to the office at some point, but not every day, according to a recent Google survey of its employees’ desires for post-pandemic work.
  • The company said it is planning “hybrid” models for future work, including rearranging its offices, Alphabet CEO Sundar Pichai said in an interview with Time magazine on Wednesday.
  • Silicon Valley companies are competing on flexible work options for existing and prospective talent.



Sundar Pichai wearing a suit and tie: Sundar Pichai, chief executive officer of Alphabet Inc., gestures while speaking during a discussion on artificial intelligence at the Bruegel European economic think tank in Brussels, Belgium, on Monday, Jan. 20, 2020. Pichai urged the U.S. and European Union to coordinate regulatory approaches on artificial intelligence, calling their alignment critical.


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Sundar Pichai, chief executive officer of Alphabet Inc., gestures while speaking during a discussion on artificial intelligence at the Bruegel European economic think tank in Brussels, Belgium, on Monday, Jan. 20, 2020. Pichai urged the U.S. and European Union to coordinate regulatory approaches on artificial intelligence, calling their alignment critical.

Google is rethinking its long-term work options for employees, as most of them say they don’t want to come back to the office full-time.

Sixty-two

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