Eagles to allow limited number of fans at Lincoln Financial Field for remaining home games

The Philadelphia Eagles are reopening the doors to Lincoln Financial Field. The team announced on Tuesday that they will welcome up to 7,500 people into home games for the remainder of the season. The capacity limit includes all players, coaches, team employees, stadium personnel and media, as well as fans in attendance.

The first game with fans will be against the Baltimore Ravens on Sunday.

Here’s what the Eagles wrote about the decision, via the team website:

“Under the guidelines set forth by the National Football League and public health experts, and with the approval of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania and the City of Philadelphia, the Eagles have finalized plans that will lead to a limited capacity of fans returning to Lincoln Financial Field, starting this Sunday.”

President Don Smolenski said they have worked closely with state and local officials, public health experts and the NFL in order to make

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A financial planner says he saw 4 surprises while buying a home

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  • As a financial planner, Mark Reyes of Albert walks his clients through the financial side of preparing for home buying all the time. 
  • But four things were slightly different than he expected in the process of buying his own first home with his wife during the coronavirus pandemic.
  • The pandemic created more competition for homes, and also meant many changes to the ways buyers are able to see potential homes. 
  • There are some parts of the process that are confusing even in normal times, like getting the right paperwork to mortgage lenders, and the escrow process before closing. 
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Buying a

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Customers Bancorp Discloses Healthy Credit Quality & Declining Loan Deferrals; Reiterates Financial Guidance

WEST READING, Pa.–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Over the last decade, Customers Bancorp and its principal subsidiary, Customers Bank (the “Bank”), have developed a suite of commercial and retail loan products with one particularly important common denominator: relatively low credit risk assumption. The Bank’s multifamily, mortgage warehouse, and specialty finance lines of business, for example, are characterized by conservative underwriting standards and low loss rates. As a consequence of this emphasis, the Bank’s credit quality to-date has been healthy despite a highly adverse economic environment. Nonperforming assets increased slightly to $92.6 million at August 31, 2020 from $86.4 million at June 30, 2020 and are expected to fall below $80.0 million by quarter-end due to the anticipated sale of an investment CRE loan.

Further, we are pleased to disclose a sharp decline in loan deferrals since financial results for Q2 2020 were released. Excluding PPP loans, active deferments decreased to $439.0 million

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Audit calls for improvements to Ignacio’s financial reporting

The town of Ignacio’s 2019 audit revealed both budgetary strengths and financial mishaps – errors town staff members vowed won’t happen again.

The town ended 2019 with a strong financial position, with growth in its overall budget and debt-free for the first time in 25 years, town staff members said. A period of employee turnover, however, raised questions about its financial checks-and-balances systems, called internal controls. Staff members had to fix multiple errors, including $83,000 of utility bills left temporarily unrecorded, according to a 2019 audit report by Hinton Burdick.

“We have the staff in place, and we have the systems in place. I would be surprised if those things showed up again,” said Tuggy Dunton, town clerk.

Hinton Burdick, which presented the report this week during a town board meeting, asked town staff members to correct some figures for accrued payroll, accounts payable, capital assets and a beginning fund

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D.C. flooding: D.C. Water offers financial assistance after flooding

“What really happened to all of our basements?” she said. “What caused this immense amount of sewage that came out of our toilet and our shower?”

D.C. Water officials tried to explain the mess during a community videoconference call Wednesday evening. The utility also offered financial help for homeowners struggling to clean up, referring to the downpour as a “100-year storm event.”

Climate change is causing more short, high-intensity storms, the utility said. D.C.’s century-old water system is aging and stressed by development. Plans for green infrastructure and an overflow tunnel would help prevent flooding but are not yet online. And the existing 124 million-gallon Anacostia River Tunnel — running seven miles from RFK Stadium to the Blue Plains wastewater treatment plant — filled in about 35 minutes.

“Even when our system was working to its maximum capacity, it just could not accommodate this event,” said Kishia L. Powell, D.C.

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