Dermot Bannon opens up about money woes following home renovation



a man wearing a suit and tie smiling at the camera


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Dermot Bannon has opened up about ‘running out of money’ following extensive renovations to his family home last year.

Our favourite architect welcomed the Room to Improve cameras into his home to showcase his own stunning house transformation.

Due to the current global circumstances, Room to Improve sadly will not return to our screens this year.



a man wearing a suit and tie smiling at the camera: Dermot Bannon has opened up about running out of money after his home renovations. Pic: Sasko Lazarov/ Photocall Ireland


© Provided by Extra.ie
Dermot Bannon has opened up about running out of money after his home renovations. Pic: Sasko Lazarov/ Photocall Ireland

However, Dermot Bannon fans will still be able to get their fix as the architect returns with a new series of Incredible Homes this weekend.

Dermot has now revealed that he is dying to get back to work as he has run out of money following his home renovations.

He told the RTE Guide that seeing his unfinished garden gave him the push he needed to get

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Mexican workers send home huge amounts of money amid virus

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A woman leaves a store offering services to send remittances to Mexico and Central America, Friday, Sept. 11, 2020, in San Diego. Mexican workers have confounded economists by sending home huge amounts of money during the coronavirus pandemic. Experts had predicted that migrant workers would wire less money, known as remittances, as the American economy took a dive.

AP

The coronavirus pandemic stopped work for nearly a month at the California farm where Luis earns $80 a day picking tomatoes, but that didn’t stop him from sending $800 to family in Mexico.

The money had traveled far by the time he was back at work in June. It kept his family fed, funded his father’s hernia operation and paid for other medical expenses.

Early in the pandemic, experts predicted that migrant workers in the U.S. like 32-year-old Luis — who didn’t want his last name used for

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Mortgage rate forecast Q4: Will the low rates continue? | Money

However, Ken H. Johnson, a housing economist at Florida Atlantic University, is less optimistic about a quick economic recovery. “Rates will remain low for at least another year,” he says. “I just do not see full or near-full economic recovery until COVID-19 no longer or minimally impacts the economy.”

— Economic recovery could boost rates

Greg McBride, CFA, Bankrate’s chief financial analyst, sees rates holding steady in the coming year. “Mortgage rates will remain at historically low levels and in no way be an impediment to well-qualified borrowers, but they won’t be quite as low as what was seen in the summer of 2020,” he says. “A refinance fee taking effect in Q4 2020 and further economic improvement will push rates a bit higher.”

Audrey Boissonou of Guarantee Mortgage in Walnut Creek, California, says the direction of the economy will prove crucial. “I’m locking people in in the high 2s

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Just Approved: Cheap money to access from home equity

Mortgage adviser: Liz Bayer, ProMortgage.

Property type: Single-family home in Berkeley.

Appraised value: $1.215 million.

Loan amount: $449,000.

Loan type: 30-year fixed.

Rate: 2.625%.

APR: 2.841%.

Backstory: I have a number of clients taking advantage of historically low rates and historically high home equity to get a cash out refinance. Past clients of mine had decided that they plan to live out their days in their home but wanted to tap into their equity to make home improvements to provide features that will benefit them as they age.

What was great is that even though they had a good rate from a previous transaction, it made all the sense in the world for them to refinance rather their mortgage taking out more than $100,000 with a new rate — which was lower than the one they had, even though this was a cashout refinance.

Although they did have a lot

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NYCHA seniors fear for their safety; councilman says he allocated money for improvements years ago

JAMAICA, Queens — A Queens councilman said he allocated hundreds of thousands of dollars to NYCHA to enhance security at a public housing building for seniors, following to years of complaints to his office about unauthorized visitors and seniors living in fear.

But those security improvements are pending.

City Councilmember Daneek Miller was told by the city last week that the new security improvements won’t be done until 2021.

Just outside NYCHA’s Conlon-Lihfe Towers in Jamaica, Queens, seniors said they are afraid to live there.

Connie Green, 79, who lives in the building, said since the pandemic, security concerns have gotten worse.

Miller said he’s been listening to the seniors complain about security for years. Back in 2017, he thought he did something about it. He allocated over $320,000 to replace front doors with new doors that would require a key card entry, and funds to pay for several new

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Cheap money to access from home equity

Mortgage adviser: Liz Bayer, ProMortgage.

Property type: Single-family home in Berkeley.

Appraised value: $1.215 million.

Loan amount: $449,000.

Loan type: 30-year fixed.

Rate: 2.625%.

APR: 2.841%.

Backstory: I have a number of clients taking advantage of historically low rates and historically high home equity to get a cash out refinance. Past clients of mine had decided that they plan to live out their days in their home but wanted to tap into their equity to make home improvements to provide features that will benefit them as they age.

What was great is that even though they had a good rate from a previous transaction, it made all the sense in the world for them to refinance rather their mortgage taking out more than $100,000 with a new rate — which was lower than the one they had, even though this was a cashout refinance.

Although they did have a lot

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More loan money available to rebuild Kenosha businesses

MADISON, Wis. (AP) — The state is making more money available to help small businesses in Kenosha recover from damage during recent unrest over the police shooting of Jacob Blake, officials announced Wednesday.

Gov. Tony Evers and the Wisconsin Economic Development Corporation said another $3 million would be added to the previously-announced $1 million in no-interest loans for small businesses.

Kenosha Fire Chief Charles Leipzig recently told the Police and Fire Commission that damage from the violence that followed Blake’s shooting Aug. 23 has topped $11 million.

The 29-year-old Black man was left partially paralyzed after a white officer shot him seven times in the back as police tried to arrest him.

The shooting, which was recorded on video and seen widely on social media, sparked protests and violence in Kenosha, where roughly two dozen fires were set and numerous businesses were destroyed.

Prosecutors say 17-year-old Kyle Rittenhouse of Antioch,

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This home upgrade might be a waste of money

REALTOR.COM

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HGTV

Tarek El Moussa of “Flip or Flop” fame now teaches novice house flippers his time-proven tricks on his new show, “Flipping 101 With Tarek El Moussa.” But as the latest episode makes painfully clear, some of his protégés need more guidance than others.

In the episode “Communication Breakdown,” El Moussa helps flippers Pino and Patsy with a house in Sylmar, CA. The house cost them only $375,000, but it may be more trouble than it’s worth. Between an expensive addition and a retaining wall that’s caving into the backyard, El Moussa isn’t sure Pino and Patsy will ever get a buyer, even with his help.

Yet in the end, El Moussa manages to turn this house around. Read on to find out how he helps these flippers save money on the renovation while not sacrificing style. His budget-friendly suggestions might inspire a few changes in your

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Millennial Money: Home costs don’t stop at a down payment | Lifestyles

— PAY CLOSE ATTENTION TO THE HOME INSPECTION. “Leaking roofs, mold, electrical and plumbing issues are the mostly commonly noted concerns on an inspection report,” says Day Coker, owner of AC by Day C, an HVAC maintenance and repair company based in High Point, North Carolina. If the inspection turns up issues, negotiate with the seller to either repair them or lower the selling price.

— FIND OUT THE AGE OF MAJOR APPLIANCES. When you can estimate how many years an appliance has left, you can save up for its replacement.

— CREATE A REPAIR FUND. Aim to save around $5,000, says Chelsea Lipford Wolf, co-host of the “Today’s Homeowner” TV show and creator of “Checking In With Chelsea,” a home improvement blog and video series. “That would cover most home systems that you would need to repair to keep your house running.”

2. YOU’LL WANT TO MAKE YOUR HOUSE

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