HomeAdvisor Expands HomeAdvisor Pay After Surpassing Millions of Dollars Worth of Home Projects

DENVER, Oct. 14, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — HomeAdvisor, a leading digital marketplace and operating business of ANGI Homeservices (NASDAQ: ANGI), has expanded its digital payment tool HomeAdvisor Pay to allow HomeAdvisor’s service pros to reach all homeowner customers nationwide. Service pros can now request and receive payments from any customer including HomeAdvisor customers and customers not from HomeAdvisor. According to HomeAdvisor’s  2019 State of Home Spending Report, 60 percent of consumers still pay for their home service projects via traditional high-contact methods like cash or check. HomeAdvisor Pay is making an easy, economical way for more home service pros to accept credit card payments and make it easier for customers to pay for home services.

“We love HomeAdvisor Pay,” said Seth Rambo, owner of Ascape Landscaping in Scranton, PA. “It’s a seamless way for our customers to pay for their invoices, that is not only user friendly for our

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How to Pay for a Home Remodel Without Tapping Your Equity

Erin Nelsen’s house could use more walls.

The certified financial planner works outside the home from an office in Cypress, California. But her husband, Shawn, works from a makeshift home office in their kitchen. From there, he hears his kids attending online school through an opening to the adjacent dining room.

To accommodate his new working conditions, Shawn taped a “sound-insulating foam barrier” in the opening, Nelsen says.

Other homeowners have used their time sheltering in place to make more permanent changes. About one-third (34%) of homeowners who have done improvements since March 1 started sooner than planned because they had more free time at home during COVID-19 social distancing measures. That’s according to a NerdWallet survey conducted online by The Harris Poll among more than 800 homeowners who have done home improvements since March 1.

Seven percent of those renovating homeowners used a home equity loan or line of

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The Best Way to Pay for Home Renovations This Fall

Given that most of us have been sheltering in place since March, it’s no wonder that we’re in the mood to renovate our homes. The online remodeling platform Houzz reported a 58% jump in the number of contractors’ project leads this June from the year before. Contractors working in outdoor spaces saw the largest increase, as folks looked to have pools and spas installed. Homeowners also seem far more interested in decks, patios, and landscaping than they were pre-pandemic. Kitchens and baths, traditionally the most popular remodeling projects, saw a 40% increase in demand.

If you’re itching to give your place a facelift, you may wonder about the best way to pay for it. Here are six possible home renovation financing options:

1. Personal loans

Personal loans are available through online lenders, banks, and credit unions. It is not uncommon to find personal loans for as much as $100,000. If

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List of jobs in cannabis industry that pay the most

  • Salaries are rising in the cannabis industry.
  • There are 24 non-executive roles in cannabis that offer six-figure salaries, according to a recent report by CannabizTeam.
  • They range from cultivation manager to director of compliance to director of IT.
  • All the roles on this list have seen salary increases since 2019.
  • Subscribe to Insider Cannabis for more stories like this.

 

Cannabis salaries are increasing as companies poach executives and senior management from other sector like retail, consumer packaged goods, pharmaceuticals, and biotech.

That’s especially true for top-level positions. The average salary for executive positions rose 16% in the first half of 2020, compared to 2019, according to a report from cannabis staffing agency CannabizTeam.

“Over the past six months we have seen an increasing flow of senior management moving to cannabis from the consumer packaged goods, biotech, food and beverage, retail, financial services and pharmaceutical industries,” Liesl Bernard, CEO of CannabizTeam,

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DIY or Pay a Pro? What to Know About the Cost of Protecting Your Home This Fall

Fall is here, and while we’re all busy guzzling pumpkin lattes and buying sweaters, homeowners need to figure out what to do about all the leaves falling in their yards — and onto their roofs and gutters.



a man standing in front of a brick building: Gutter-Guards-DIY-Pay-Install


© Shutterstock
Gutter-Guards-DIY-Pay-Install

As we’re previously pointed out, if you own a home and live in a spot where leaves and debris can accumulate in your gutters, you may want to invest in gutter guards. These guards help prevent your gutters from getting clogged by leaves — a situation that can cause problems for your roof, drainage, and the gutters themselves.

Keep in mind that even after you’ve installed gutter guards, you’re still going to need to give your gutters a cleaning about once a year according to Eamon Lynch, director of warranty service at the Philadelphia-based Power Home Remodeling. Why? Just to make sure that no bits of debris

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Comparing 4 ways to pay for home renovations

After months of lockdown during the pandemic, many have become aware of the failings of their homes. Whether you want a cosmetic update or think your home may have a more serious problem, how to pay for a renovation may be your main concern.

We asked Todd Nelson of home improvement lender LightStream for suggestions on how to decide which projects to do and how to stretch your budget without derailing your long-term financial plans.

“Rather than procrastinate because you don’t know what to do first, it’s best to prioritize your projects,” wrote Nelson in an email. “If you’re not sure about the condition of your home, consider having your home assessed by a licensed home inspector. Tackle structural and mechanical system issues as soon as possible to ensure your home’s physical integrity and safety, as well as to prevent costly repairs in the future.”

While hiring a home inspector

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4 Ways to Pay for a Home Remodel

As long-time DoughRoller readers may know, my husband and I went about our journey into homeownership in a slightly off-beat way. Long story short: we own a 2,400 square foot duplex in Indianapolis and have no mortgage. But we do have a significant amount of work left to do, nearly three years into the process.

Owning a fixer-upper has been a fun journey for our family, but it hasn’t always been easy. Besides not always having running water and never having central A/C, we’ve also had to figure out how to finance all the repairs our home needs.

I’m happy to say that we’re now well on our way. Soon, we’ll be closing on a mortgage that will allow us to pay contractors to finish the rest of the work on our home.

Going through this process has taught me quite a bit about options for financing a fixer-upper, too.

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Spain’s Home-Working Draft Bill to Make Employers Pay for Expenses | Investing News

MADRID (Reuters) – The Spanish government has agreed with unions and business leaders that employers must cover home working expenses after the coronavirus pandemic caused millions to work from their living rooms, Deputy Prime Minister Pablo Iglesias said on Tuesday.

“It was fundamental to regulate remote working to protect the rights of workers,” Iglesias said in an interview with state-owned TV channel TVE.

Labour Minister Yolanda Diaz had told him about the agreement late on Monday, he said.

Under the government’s draft proposal seen by Reuters, companies would have to bankroll all expenses employees may have when working from home, including computer equipment and furniture, while employees can ask for flexible working hours.

The benefits would only apply to employees who stay home for at least 30% of their work schedule, and employers will have the right to monitor workers’ online presence while respecting dignity and privacy, and to ask

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I moved into my in-laws’ home. My husband wants to pay his parents’ mortgage, but it will come out of my income. How can I protect myself?

Dear Moneyist,

I got married recently and moved into my husband’s house that he shares with his parents. (His name and his parents’ name are on the deed.) Currently, we pay a small amount for rent, but my husband hopes to take on the mortgage of the house over the next couple of years. I am the breadwinner, and so the majority (or even all) of the money that would go towards the mortgage would be coming from me.

Before fully committing to this, are there any precautions I need to take? Or what are the risks I could be facing? I am worried about what would happen if I end up paying off their home, and they want to sell it or my in-laws pass away, or if they decide to give their share of the house to my husband’s sister, or if my husband and I separate (which

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