Covid-19 isolated nursing home residents. Now it may keep them from voting.

Nursing home residents have always faced challenges voting — because of limited mobility, physical infirmity and the restrictive reality of institutional life. But there were many ways to get help: Residents who were mobile and had access to transportation could vote at general polling places, families could freely visit to help residents vote by mail, and, in some states, election officials conducted voting in nursing homes. Now, the novel coronavirus has changed much of that: In-person voting risks infection, and visitors who might help with mail-in voting are barred from many homes. Short-staffed and still concentrating on other challenges posed by the pandemic, facilities do not seem ready to step up.

“Facilities throughout the state have made little or no efforts to assist residents” to vote by mail in “what may be the most important election in their lifetimes,” representatives of a dozen community advocacy groups wrote to Pennsylvania health

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Nursing home residents stage protest of coronavirus restrictions

About 20 residents of a Greeley, Colo., nursing facility gathered to demonstrate against coronavirus restrictions in the state.

The residents, many of them wheelchair users, assembled outside Fairacres Manor Thursday, a local CBS affiliate reported.

“They want to be able to hug their grandchildren, they want to be able to hold the hands of their loved ones,” said Ben Gonzales, an assistant administrator at the facility, according to CBS4. 

Gonzales said staff members, who were present at the protest in masks and eye protection, “want them [residents] to know that their voice does matter.”

Under current restrictions, residents are forbidden from physical contact, although visits are still permitted, the TV station noted.

“We used to be lucky here at Fairacres to show each other what we mean to one another and we cannot do that anymore,” said Resident Council President Sharon Peterson. “Fairacres follows the rules and, with that, we

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With no power, Louisiana residents return home to assess Hurricane Delta damage

By Stephanie Kelly



a castle on top of a house: FILE PHOTO: A destroyed home is reflected in flood waters in the aftermath of Hurricane Delta in Creole, Louisiana


© Reuters/ADREES LATIF
FILE PHOTO: A destroyed home is reflected in flood waters in the aftermath of Hurricane Delta in Creole, Louisiana

LAKE CHARLES, La. (Reuters) – Louisianans continued storm cleanup on Sunday after Hurricane Delta rolled through the region on Friday, as more returned to survey damage to their homes, having waited out the storm elsewhere.

Delta made landfall near the town of Creole in Cameron Parish early Friday evening as a Category 2 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson scale, packing sustained winds of 100 miles per hour (160 km per hour).

By Sunday the storm had weakened to a post-tropical cyclone, but continued to be a heavy rainfall threat, the National Hurricane Center said.

The storm knocked out power for more than half a million customers and compounded damage from the more powerful Hurricane Laura, which devastated the region in August.

Video: Hurricane Delta weakens after

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With No Power, Louisiana Residents Return Home to Assess Hurricane Delta Damage | Top News

LAKE CHARLES, La. (Reuters) – Louisianans continued storm cleanup on Sunday after Hurricane Delta rolled through the region on Friday, as more returned to survey damage to their homes, having waited out the storm elsewhere.

Delta made landfall near the town of Creole in Cameron Parish early Friday evening as a Category 2 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson scale, packing sustained winds of 100 miles per hour (160 km per hour).

By Sunday the storm had weakened to a post-tropical cyclone, but continued to be a heavy rainfall threat, the National Hurricane Center said.

The storm knocked out power for more than half a million customers and compounded damage from the more powerful Hurricane Laura, which devastated the region in August.

Though Sam Jones, 77, waited out the storm in his Lake Charles home, he was leaving on Sunday to stay with his son in Fort Worth, Texas, because his electricity

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Nursing Home Residents Struggle to Vote Amid the Coronavirus Pandemic

Rosewood Care Center in Inverness, Ill. on April 13, 2019. (Danielle Scruggs/The New York Times)
Rosewood Care Center in Inverness, Ill. on April 13, 2019. (Danielle Scruggs/The New York Times)

Rosewood Care Center in Inverness, Ill. on April 13, 2019. Credit – Danielle A. Scruggs—The New York Times/Redux

Ivan Lakos was born in Hungary and came to the United States in 1951 as a displaced person after World War II. He became a citizen after about five years and has voted consistently ever since. But this year, with COVID-19 cases again on the rise in the U.S., the 96-year-old worried whether he’d be able to continue that tradition.

Lakos lives in a skilled nursing home at the Carol Woods Retirement Community in North Carolina, which is home to roughly 500 residents and usually hosts its own polling place with volunteers on hand to help residents fill out ballots and navigate voting machines. But this year, that isn’t an option for him. To protect against COVID-19,

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Carter Williams, Who Unshackled Nursing Home Residents, Dies at 97

In journal articles, conferences, congressional hearings and meetings with regulators, Carter Catlett Williams illuminated the miseries of nursing home residents with the sympathetic and descriptive powers of a novelist.

She told stories like that of Miss Cohen, whose restrictive diet prohibited the “warm, fragrant chunk of challah” she had eaten on Friday nights her whole life, causing Miss Cohen to refuse food entirely; and of Mr. Denby, a “courtly, dignified former executive” who underwent “identity loss” after he became “unable to rise to greet or bid farewell to his guest because he is tied to his chair.”

She amassed hundreds of accounts along these lines. They helped Ms. Williams influence the 1987 Nursing Home Reform Act, which required skilled nursing facilities to maintain the “physical, mental and psychosocial well-being of each resident.”

The law transformed common practices in nursing homes and strengthened a reform movement, some of whose arguments have

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Residents come up with elaborate ideas that dot landscapes around Martinsville and Henry County | Home & Garden

While there are certainly some yard projects people can complete on their own, adding a popular water feature requires more know-how than grabbing a shovel and a garden hose. Other projects also deserve the knowledge of a trained professional.

Planting a bed of flowers might not seem like rocket science, but Cox noted that even that can take an unexpected turn over several years’ time if the plants are not properly spaced to begin with.

Then there are the technical aspects of landscaping, like properly installing irrigation systems.

However, not every yard project takes years of experience to do well. For those who aren’t quite ready to put a down payment on their backyard retreat, but want to spruce up their yard, Cox expressed that simple maintenance can go a long way when boosting curb appeal.

“I think mulching. I think neatness. Keeping the yard picked up, leaves out of

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Jharia residents demand renovation of historic pond

Discharge of sewage and lack of desiltation prove bane for waterbody



More than 50 residents of Jharia on Friday walked in a protest march and shouted slogans demanding the renovation of the historic Raja Talab which has fallen into disrepair. 

The protesters, led by former councillor Anup Sao and NGO Institution for National Amity founder Pinaki Roy, raised slogans against the Dhanbad Municipal Corporation and district administration and demanded a probe into the allegations of corruption in the renovation of the pond.

Established by a former ruler, Durga Prasad Singh, on 8.26 acres, the pond was once the centre of all religious activity in Jharia, including the celebration of Chhath Puja and Durga Puja and the performance of last rites. The pond, however, has become polluted due to a host of reasons, including the discharge of sewage and washing of clothes, dishes and domestic animals by residents of nearby areas. 

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Home repair companies, City of Phoenix help rebuild resident’s home after fire

Phoenix homeowner Mary Chavez thought a day like today would never come.

After a gas water heater fire nearly destroyed her home last year, Mary’s been without power or a ceiling over her kitchen for eight months. 

Chavez says she was relieved when total strangers stepped up to rebuild her broken home.

“I’m very thankful,” she said. “I never thought it would be this much.”

Local home repair companies teamed up with the City of Phoenix for “Building Safety Month,” coming together to give back to those in need.

“We’re rebuilding the roof structure that weak[sic] before we put the new roof down,” said Don Councilor. “We’ve got the engineering and repairs done and we had it inspected. Now, we’re just replacing bad parts

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As Summerville park sees improvements, Black residents remember its cultural impact | News

SUMMERVILLE — Years ago, Doty Park near downtown looked drastically different when it was a huge hub for Black residents.

There wasn’t a community center. And baseball fields used to sit where tennis courts now stand. Those fields were typically filled predominately with Black residents from the Alston and Brownsville areas. 

Anthony Pinckney, a 58-year-old native Summerville resident, said his wife ran the concession stand. He used to drive around the park after the baseball fields were replaced, trying to remember the good days.

Louis Smith, another longtime Summerville resident, said being there in the 1980s and ’90s felt like a neighborhood experience.

“You probably had a lot of marriage proposals out there,” he said. “It was a cultural hub of the community.”

For decades, Doty Park was the home to the Carolina Dixie Youth Baseball League. It was a program where Black and White children in large numbers could

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