DVIDS – News – Under Secretary of Army McPherson tours schools, housing renovation site


FORT LEE, Va. (Oct. 13, 2020) — The Army’s second-highest-ranking civilian spent a good part of his day here Oct. 7 touring training facilities, conversing with troops and spotlighting efforts to improve privatized military family housing.

Under Secretary of the Army James McPherson received a glimpse of quartermaster and ordnance training, lunched with students at the Samuel Sharpe Dining Facility and addressed members of the media outside a newly renovated residence in the Jackson Circle neighborhood.

Maj. Gen. Rodney D. Fogg, U.S. Army Combined Arms Support Command and Fort Lee commanding general, hosted the undersecretary and accompanied him throughout the tour.

McPherson’s first stop was the QM School’s Petroleum and Water Department. There, he met with administrators, instructors and students. He also received a familiarization on the latest virtual training systems said to save time and resources while improving technical skills.

Advanced individual training Soldiers Spc. Zoya Goodwin,

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West End school’s slated renovation sparks memories of neighborhood’s history of gentrification

CINCINNATI — Golan Marom may not be from the West End, but he said feels a connection to the buildings in the neighborhood anyway.

“The architecture and the history of that area, I think, is really, really wonderful,” Marom, the CEO and founder of Zada Development, said. “I think that it’s unique in that it just has its own character to it.”

The developer from New York is fixated on redeveloping the Heberle Elementary School building on Freeman Avenue, a vacant property he acquired about two years ago. Built in 1929, the school has been closed since 2007 because of students’ declining enrollment and poor condition. Some in the neighborhood say the building has been languishing over time as evidenced by its cracked and boarded up windows, and the weeds springing up from the pavement in its front yard. In 2018, it was reported that a part of the building’s

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Stapleton Public Schools board proposes bond issue for addition, remodeling at school | Education

The movement toward the project began in earnest last year, Hora said.

“We looked at the school and the board wanted to narrow it down to what they felt was really needed,” Hora said, “and to do it fiscally responsibly.”

A brochure identifies what the project would address: safety/security, non-code-compliant restrooms, substandard locker rooms, a non-private student health and services area, a congested commons area and aging parts of the building that are no longer adequate.

Gaffney said security to monitor who enters the building is inadequate.

“The camera system doesn’t take a very wide view and there may be more than one person wanting to check in,” Gaffney said. “In visiting with other superintendents, that’s a real safety issue.”

Another issue is the music room, which lacks adequate storage, Hora said. A new music room would be part of the addition on the east side of the building and

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Poughkeepsie voters to decide on $98M schools project before general election

City of Poughkeepsie residents will soon cast votes that will impact the future for themselves and their children.



a person standing in front of a brick building: Poughkeepsie Middle School on July 1, 2019.


© Patrick Oehler/Poughkeepsie Journal
Poughkeepsie Middle School on July 1, 2019.

Soon after, residents around the country will head to the polls for the general election.

The Poughkeepsie City School District is holding a bond vote on Oct. 20, two weeks before the presidential election, asking residents to approve one of two capital improvement plans, which would cost roughly $48 million or $98 million, depending on the option favored.

The propositions were originally planned to be included in the spring’s school budget votes, but the district removed them from the ballot amid the uncertainty surrounding the initial months of the COVID-19 pandemic, in which all budget votes were postponed from May to June.



a bench in front of a brick building: Dilapidated steps are pictured at Clinton Elementary School.


© Courtesy photo
Dilapidated steps are pictured at Clinton Elementary School.

Superintendent Eric Rosser acknowledged that rescheduling the proposition

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Poughkeepsie schools capital plan seeks building repairs, programming

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Soon, City of Poughkeepsie residents will cast votes that will impact the future for themselves and their children.

Soon after, residents around the country will head to the polls for the general election.

The Poughkeepsie City School District is holding a bond vote on Oct. 20, two weeks before the Presidential election, asking residents to approve one of two capital improvement plans, which would either cost roughly $48 million or $98 million, depending on the option favored.

The propositions were originally planned to be included in the spring’s school budget votes, but the district removed them from the ballot amid the uncertainty of the opening months of the COVID-19 pandemic, in which all budget votes were delayed from May to June.

Dilapidated steps are pictured at Clinton Elementary School. (Photo: Courtesy photo)

Superintendent Eric Rosser acknowledged rescheduling the proposition vote so close to the general election could impact voter

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Baltimore County High Schools Will Need $1.2B In Capital Improvements Over Next 7 Years, Report Finds

TOWSON, Md. (WJZ) — Baltimore County’s public high schools will likely need $1.2 billion in capital improvements over a seven-year period, an initial report analyzing the school system’s infrastructure needs found.

The report, released Tuesday and put together by consultants from CannonDesign, outlines $448 million in need to address capacity issues within county high schools and another $349 million needed to improve the schools’ conditions.

The remaining $423 million is needed to address educational adequacy and equity, including factors like safety, technology and educational programming, according to the report.

Roughly one-fifth of the improvements — $244 million — are listed as being “critical,” mainly to address overcrowded schools.

To address space concerns and a projected increase of 1,700 high school students over the next decade, the report recommends the school system explore additions to numerous high schools or build new ones after soliciting community feedback. An initial community survey

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Oshkosh, Omro schools to hold referendum informational sessions

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When voters from Oshkosh and Omro school districts cast their Nov. 3 ballots, they’ll also decide whether to let officials increase property taxes beyond their levy limits.

To educate voters, both districts are holding informational sessions to address any concerns about the referendum questions on the ballot.

Oshkosh is holding sessions at 6 p.m. Tuesday at Carl Traeger Elementary School and Thursday at Webster Stanley Middle School and a virtual session on Oct. 6 via Zoom. Omro’s session will be 6 p.m. Oct. 20 at Omro High School Performing Arts Center.

Attendees in both Omro and Oshkosh will be required to social distance and wear masks.

Oshkosh referendum seeks to build two new schools 

Oshkosh Area School District voters will decide whether to approve two referendum questions, worth a combined $115 million, on the Nov. 3 ballot.

The referendum questions ask voters to renew $7.95 million in operating funds

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Runny nose, stay home? Canada schools debate how to act on common cold symptoms

OTTAWA (Reuters) – Just four days into the new school year, Trevor Boutilier’s five-year-old son was sent home from his Ottawa kindergarten with a runny nose and slight cough, and told to stay away until he’d had a COVID-19 test and was symptom free.

FILE PHOTO: Students arrive for the first time since the start of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic at Hunter’s Glen Junior Public School, part of the Toronto District School Board (TDSB) in Scarborough, Ontario, Canada September 15, 2020. REUTERS/Carlos Osorio/File Photo

The local testing center was overrun, so Boutilier drove his son miles out of the city to a small town for the test. They waited for four days for the result, which came back negative.

By then, his son, who suffers seasonal allergies, had been symptom free for days and missed nearly a week of school.

“If you’re going to send them home and have

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