Trump tells Congress to ‘go big or go home’ on coronavirus stimulus



a man wearing a suit and tie: Trump tells Congress to 'go big or go home' on coronavirus stimulus


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Trump tells Congress to ‘go big or go home’ on coronavirus stimulus

President Trump urged Congress to “go big or go home” on another round of coronavirus stimulus, amid broad objections within his own party to his latest $1.8 trillion proposal.

“STIMULUS! Go big or go home!!!” Trump tweeted Tuesday morning.

In doing so, the president undermined a statement from Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) less than an hour earlier that said the upper chamber would vote on a bill providing “targeted relief for American workers” that includes more funding for small business loans through the Paycheck Protection Program (PPP).

“When the full Senate returns on October 19th, our first order of business will be voting again on targeted relief for American workers, including new funding for the PPP,” McConnell said.

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Afghans stunned, worried by Trump tweet to bring home U.S. troops early

Taliban leaders have reacted with open delight, welcoming Trump’s Oct. 7 statement and reportedly telling CBS News that they hoped he will win reelection in November. The group’s top spokesman later said his comment to that effect had been “incorrectly” interpreted, after it set off a frenzy of controversy and was rejected by the White House.

But many Afghans and analysts say they fear that if Trump follows through, abruptly dropping the U.S.-Taliban agreement for a conditions-based and gradual pullout of the about 4,500 remaining U.S. troops by May, the country may plunge again into full-scale war and political mayhem.

“If the withdrawal takes place according to the tweet, it will create chaos. The peace process will collapse, and we will go back to square one,” said Ehsanullah Zia, a former senior Afghan official who heads the Kabul office of the U.S. Institute of Peace. “This is the only thing

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Trump says remaining troops should be home from Afghanistan by Christmas

In its own deal struck earlier this year with the Taliban, the Trump administration said it would remove all U.S. forces from Afghanistan by next spring if the Taliban complied with certain conditions, including a reduction in violence and the Taliban severing all relations with al-Qaeda militants.

Afghan government officials have said they see no evidence of such a break, and the level of violence has sharply increased in Afghanistan in recent months.

U.S. military officials last month announced that U.S. troop deployments would be reduced from about 8,600 to about 4,000 this fall but have said a full withdrawal would come only if conditions permit. U.S. forces in Afghanistan peaked around 100,000 under the Obama administration. Although they had fallen dramatically by the time Trump took office, he added several thousand early in his term on the recommendation of the military.

Earlier in the day, White House national security

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U.S. troops in Afghanistan should be ‘home by Christmas’: Trump

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – All U.S. troops in Afghanistan should be “home by Christmas,” President Donald Trump said on Wednesday, just hours after his national security adviser said Washington would reduce its forces in Afghanistan to 2,500 by early next year.

A landmark deal between the United States and the Taliban in February said foreign forces would leave Afghanistan by May 2021 in exchange for counterterrorism guarantees from the Taliban, which agreed to negotiate a permanent ceasefire and a power-sharing formula with the Afghan government.

Trump and other officials have said the United States will go down to between 4,000 and 5,000 troops in Afghanistan around November.

Beyond that, officials have said that a reduction will depend on conditions in Afghanistan.

On Twitter, Trump said: “We should have the small remaining number of our BRAVE Men and Women serving in Afghanistan home by Christmas!”

It was unclear whether Trump was giving

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Trump tweets troops in Afghanistan “should” be home by Christmas

President Trump on Wednesday tweeted that the U.S. troops in Afghanistan “should” be home by Christmas, but it’s unclear whether the president meant he’s ordering troops home, or rather he merely wants them to come home. 

Such a move would be against the current advice of his military commanders, who do not believe it is safe to go below 4,500 troops unless the Taliban breaks with al Qaeda and reduces the level of violence. In February, the U.S. and the Taliban signed a deal for American troops to withdraw in the spring of 2021. 

“We should have the small remaining number of our BRAVE Men and Women serving in Afghanistan home by Christmas!” the president tweeted Wednesday evening, shortly before the vice presidential debate. 

The administration already announced the U.S. would be pulling 1,200 troops from Iraq, as a part of the president’s follow through on his campaign promise

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Trump Uses His Return to White House as Reckless Photo Op

Three days after a high fever and oxygen crisis put him in the hospital, coronavirus-infected Donald Trump returned to the White House and pulled off his mask for a photo-opportunity that was immediately turned into a video meant to show he had beaten COVID-19.

But even Trump’s own doctor concedes that he “may not entirely be out of the woods yet,” and the president appeared to be winded after climbing the steps to the White House to pose between two American flags.

Several staffers stood nearby as he tucked his mask into his suit pocket and saluted Marine One, which had landed on the lawn minutes earlier. At one point, he walked into the building—still not wearing a mask—and then returned to the balcony for a re-shoot.

The display of optics over safety came hours after Trump—who has been given two experimental treatments and a heavy-duty steroid—tweeted a message that

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Opinion | Doctors say Trump may go home Monday. Based on what they’ve told us, that’s a bad idea.

Let’s begin with what we know about the president’s vital signs, which are called “vital” for a reason. They are the single most important descriptor of how patients are doing. It’s also not enough to have one set of vitals, but to see trends. When doctors and nurses do rounds in the hospital, we pore over charts of all of the patient’s vitals during the past 24 hours.

We don’t have these numbers for Trump. During Saturday’s news conference, Conley described his patient’s vitals as “great.” Less than an hour later, an anonymous source (later identified as White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows) said that the president’s vital signs had been “very concerning.” If both are true, then that in itself is worrisome: It points to a changing clinical picture that must be closely followed.

In particular, we need to be watchful of the president’s respiratory status. In many

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How Trump Brought Home the Endless War

Every generation delivers its own update to the worry, as old as democracy, that military crusades abroad will come back to damage freedom at home. The Founders of the United States, haunted by ancient Rome’s descent from republic to empire, resisted establishing a standing army. At the end of the First World War, the American Civil Liberties Union formed in opposition to mass arrests and deportations carried out by the Department of Justice. In our own time, it seemed apparent, until recently, that the main blowback of the war on terror would be the surveillance state inaugurated by the Patriot Act of 2001. Yet, while troubling, mass surveillance did not prompt most Americans to think that their country had become fundamentally unfree. The link between foreign intervention and domestic repression retained an almost metaphorical quality, as when Secretary of State John Quincy Adams warned, in 1821, that if it became

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Trump Administration Invests $268 Million in Rural Water and Wastewater Infrastructure Improvements in 28 States

Projects Will Improve Rural Water Infrastructure for 267,000 Rural Residents and Businesses

WASHINGTON, Sept. 22, 2020 – The Trump Administration today announced that the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) is investing $268 million to modernize rural drinking water and wastewater infrastructure across 28 states (PDF, 222 KB).

“Upgrading the infrastructure that delivers safe drinking water and modern wastewater management facilities will improve public health and drive economic development in our small towns and cities,” Deputy Under Secretary for Rural Development Bette Brand said. “Under the leadership of President Trump and Agriculture Secretary Perdue, USDA is a strong partner with rural communities, because we know that when rural America thrives, all of America thrives.”

Background:

USDA is funding 76 projects through the Water and Waste Disposal Loan and Grant Program. These investments will help to improve rural water infrastructure for 267,000 residents. For example:

  • The city of Greenville, Ill., will
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Trump Administration invests in Rural Kansas energy efficiency improvements

TOPEKA, Kan. (WIBW) – The Trump Administration has invested over $354,000 in energy efficiency improvements in Rural Kansas, helping 17 small businesses and agricultural producers lower their energy costs.



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The U.S. Department of Agriculture says its Rural Development State Director for Kansas, Lynne Hinrichsen, announced it is investing $558,552 in order to make energy efficiency improvements and reduce costs for farmers, ag producers and rural-based businesses and institutions in Kansas.

“By improving the energy efficiency of farms and businesses, energy expenses are decreased and new opportunities for improvement are created elsewhere,” said Hinrichsen. “Under the leadership of President Trump and Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue, USDA continues to be a strong partner to rural Kansas in building stronger and healthier communities through energy efficiency, because we know when rural America thrives, all of America thrives.”

The USDA said those receiving grants are as follows:

  • Conway
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