Nearly nine of 10 workers want to keep work-from-home option

LONDON (Reuters) – Nearly nine out of 10 workers want to be able to choose whether to work from home or the office once COVID-19 workplace restrictions ease, and have greater autonomy over their hours, according to research from Cisco Systems.

The pandemic has rapidly shifted attitudes towards home working, the research showed, with two thirds of workers developing a greater appreciation of the benefits and challenges of doing their jobs remotely.

Even though only 5% of those surveyed worked from home most of the time before the lockdown, now 87% of workers wanted the ability to choose where, how and when they worked – blending between being office-based and working remotely, Cisco said in a report issued on Wednesday.

Cisco Vice President Gordon Thomson said companies would have to reconfigure how they operate to help meet the new demands of workers, who prioritised effective communication and collaboration above everything

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How To Help Your Sales Teams Avoid Work-From-Home Burnout

I am CSO of the Bridge Group, responsible for sales and customer success.

While there are a lot of good and positive things about remote working (especially avoiding lengthy commutes and traffic), there are also downsides that we’ve never had to deal with before. At first, working at home was kind of a nice change. Many sales reps who used to travel three out of every four weeks of the month could now spend more time with their families or have more time to themselves. However, as the work-from-home situation continues, many of them are starting to feel even more isolated because they are not used to being at home this much. They miss being on the road, spending time with their team and visiting with clients face to face. It’s been a real adjustment.

Here are some tips to help your sales team feel connected and avoid

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Nearly nine of 10 workers want to keep work-from-home option: survey

LONDON (Reuters) – Nearly nine out of 10 workers want to be able to choose whether to work from home or the office once COVID-19 workplace restrictions ease, and have greater autonomy over their hours, according to research from Cisco Systems CSCO.O.

The pandemic has rapidly shifted attitudes towards home working, the research showed, with two thirds of workers developing a greater appreciation of the benefits and challenges of doing their jobs remotely.

Even though only 5% of those surveyed worked from home most of the time before the lockdown, now 87% of workers wanted the ability to choose where, how and when they worked – blending between being office-based and working remotely, Cisco said in a report issued on Wednesday.

Cisco Vice President Gordon Thomson said companies would have to reconfigure how they operate to help meet the new demands of workers, who prioritised effective communication and collaboration

Read More

Dropbox is letting all employees work-from-home permanently

  • Dropbox just announced it will allow all employees to work from home permanently. 
  • The company initially ordered staff to work from home in March, during the initial outbreak of COVID-19 in the US.
  • The company plans to convert its existing offices to coworking spaces to aid in team-building and collaborating.
  • Twitter and Atlassian have also allowed all employees to permanently work from home.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Dropbox is going remote — permanently. 

The cloud storage company announced Tuesday it will allow all employees to work from home going forward. The shift comes after an internal survey found nearly 90% of Dropbox workers said they are more productive at home.

“Starting today, Dropbox is becoming a Virtual First company,” the company said in a blog post. “Remote work (outside an office) will be the primary experience for all employees and the day-to-day default for individual work.”

Dropbox

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China Exports Supercharged by Medical Equipment and Work-From-Home Gear

BEIJING—China’s exports and imports both posted strong gains in September, as a recovery in global and domestic demand provided another boost to the world’s second-largest economy.

China’s imports from global markets jumped 13.2% in September from a year earlier after falling 2.1% in August, according to data released Tuesday by the General Administration of Customs.

Exports topped market expectations for a sixth straight month, rising 9.9% from a year earlier in September—the quickest pace in more than a year—as China continued to benefit from coronavirus-fueled demand for medical equipment and work-from-home electronic products.

Taken together, the strong trade figures point to a robust recovery that most economists expect will show China regaining its pre-coronavirus growth trajectory of between 5% and 6% when it reports third-quarter gross domestic product figures on Monday—and through the end of the year.

“In coming months, we expect the export strength to persist and imports may

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Tech Isn’t The Answer To Your Work-From-Home Culture

Ashish Kachru is Co-Founder and CEO of Altruista Health, developer of the industry’s leading care management and population health platform.

There’s a lot of buzz about what the workplace will look like once the pandemic is over. I believe we are in a great sifting process in the economy in which weak companies will fail and good companies have a chance to become great. It may surprise you that, even as the CEO of a technology company, I don’t think technology will drive the successes.

A recent McKinsey & Company study says we are headed for a future that mixes remote work arrangements with office-based work. However, the more I read and talk with employees at my company, the more convinced I am that employers are about to overlook one huge threat that comes with a heavily emerging work-from-home environment. Relying too much on technology in a work-from-home

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Who pays for the toilet paper? The big questions of the work-from-home era

AMSTERDAM (Reuters) – As the world convulses in crisis, and tens of millions of us dig in for the long haul of working from home, one question looms large: who pays for the tea and toilet paper?

A man works in his kitchen while workers are forced to work from home and demand payback for extra home office costs during the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak in Sassenheim, Netherlands October 2, 2020. REUTERS/Eva Plevier

The answer, according to the Dutch, is your bosses.

And how much? About two euros ($2.40) per working day, on average.

That’s meant to cover not only coffee, tea and toilet paper used in work hours, but also the extra gas, electricity and water, plus the depreciation costs of a desk and a chair – all essentials that you’d never dream of paying for in the office.

“We have literally calculated down to how many teaspoons there

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Nomura CEO Wades Into Debate on Work-From-Home Productivity

(Bloomberg) — Nomura Holdings Inc.’s chief executive officer has joined the debate on how effective working from home really is, as he weighs how to shape the workforce in the pandemic era.



A pedestrian holding an umbrella walks past a branch of Nomura Securities Co., a unit of Nomura Holdings Inc., at night in Tokyo, Japan, on Monday, July 27, 2020. Nomura Holdings is schedule to announce first-quarter earning figures on July 29.


© Bloomberg
A pedestrian holding an umbrella walks past a branch of Nomura Securities Co., a unit of Nomura Holdings Inc., at night in Tokyo, Japan, on Monday, July 27, 2020. Nomura Holdings is schedule to announce first-quarter earning figures on July 29.

“There are areas that have been able to stay productive, and there are those that have fallen a bit short,” CEO Kentaro Okuda said Tuesday at a Nikkei financial industry forum. “We’re undertaking a review to find out why, and how we can improve the situation.”

Global finance leaders are assessing the relative merits of working from home, including how the practice might remain once the coronavirus subsides. JPMorgan Chase & Co.’s Jamie Dimon and

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Eight Workplace Harassment Red Flags In A Work-From-Home Environment

With the current coronavirus pandemic, the world has pivoted to remote working faster than anticipated. With employers realizing it would be untenable to allow workers to come into offices because of contagion risks, the shift to work-from-home has become the norm instead of the exception.

However, just like the working environment has changed to a home-based environment, so has workplace harassment. In settings such as these, workplace harassment that follows an employee into their homes can have devastating impacts on their mental well-being, as well as on their family.

Below, eight experts from Forbes Human Resources Council discuss some of the red flags indicative of workplace harassment following employees into their remote work environment.

1. Inappropriate Comments On Work Channels

Workplace harassment, whether in an office setting or working from home, is

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Japanese Lawmaker Becomes Billionaire By Selling E-Signature Services Amid Work-From-Home Revolution

A centuries-old Japanese tradition of stamping documents with seals in place of signatures is finally waning, as more people have been working from home due to the coronavirus pandemic. Corporate giants like Toyota and Nomura are signing up for the electronic signature services of a little-known company called Bengo4.com Inc., which has sent its stock soaring 100% this year.

The share-price surge made Bengo4’s founder, Taichiro Motoe, a billionaire largely based on his 67% stake in the Tokyo-listed company he founded 15 years ago. Forbes estimates Motoe’s net worth at just over $1 billion.

Investors are optimistic about Bengo4’s e-signature service, called CloudSign, in the Covid-19 era. As more people work remotely, Japanese companies are switching to e-signatures from physical stamps called hanko to authenticate documents—a practice Japan followed since at least the 1800s. “CloudSign is changing the traditional hanko

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