4 Ways to Survive Working (and Learning) From Home With Kids

Since having my first child in 2014–and almost simultaneously launching my business–I’ve read my fair share of parenting books and articles. Most of the advice centered around finding an ideal balance between work and family demands, and squeezing in a bit of “me time” in an already hectic schedule. 

Fast forward to 2020, and exactly zero of that advice feels relevant now.

Together, along with many working parents across the country, I’m just trying to keep my head above water at work and at home (the same location!) and make sure that my kids get an education through the very screens all of those parenting books once said to avoid. 

While it’s definitely been a trial by fire situation, I have learned a lot since March about ways to make the working-and-learning-from-home situation work–or least, a little more productive for everyone involved.

And while my own advice may very

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Home working here to stay, say businesses



a woman sitting on a bed next to a window


© Getty Images


More home working is likely to be a permanent fixture for a majority of businesses, according to a study.

A survey of just under 1,000 firms by the Institute of Directors (IoD) shows that 74% plan on maintaining the increase in home working.

More than half planned on reducing their long-term use of workplaces.

A smaller survey of bosses whose firms had already cut workplace use suggested 44% of them thought working from home was proving “more effective”.

“Remote working has been one of the most tangible impacts of coronavirus on the economy. For many, it could be here to stay,” said Roger Barker, director of policy at the IoD.

“Working from doesn’t work for everyone, and directors must be alive to the downsides. Managing teams remotely can prove far from straightforward, and directors must make sure they are going out of their way to support employees’

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Home working here to stay, study of businesses suggests

A woman working at home
A woman working at home

More home working is likely to be a permanent fixture for a majority of businesses, according to a study.

A survey of just under 1,000 firms by the Institute of Directors (IoD) shows that 74% plan on maintaining the increase in home working.

More than half planned on reducing their long-term use of workplaces.

A smaller survey of bosses whose firms had already cut workplace use suggested 44% of them thought working from home was proving “more effective”.

“Remote working has been one of the most tangible impacts of coronavirus on the economy. For many, it could be here to stay,” said Roger Barker, director of policy at the IoD.

“Working from doesn’t work for everyone, and directors must be alive to the downsides. Managing teams remotely can prove far from straightforward, and directors must make sure they are going out of their way to

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The new workwear attire brand that launched when everyone is working from home

This is an installment in a special series, Startup Year One, interviewing startup founders about the major lessons they learned in the immediate aftermath of their businesses’ first year of operation.



Pairess co-founders Amy JIang and Showly Wang


© Courtesy of Pairess
Pairess co-founders Amy JIang and Showly Wang

While it might seem counterintuitive, getting dressed for work—even for working at home—is actually an even greater burden and source of anxiety for women professionals in the Zoom era.

So says Showly Wang, who with cofounder Amy Jiang, recently launched Pairess, a self-described feminist, direct-to-consumer fashion brand on a mission to help women succeed professionally with stylish apparel that’s also functional. (Think real pockets that actually fit a phone and machine washable fabrics.)

Fortune recently spoke with Wang and Jiang about how the first few months are going and what the pair plans to do next.

The following interview has been condensed and lightly edited for clarity.



Amy Jiang and Showly Wang, cofounders of Pairess.


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Fed says Powell has been working from home, observing mask and distance protocols

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell has been working from home while also following masking and social distancing protocols when in public, and has not felt it necessary to take a coronavirus test, the Fed said Friday in response to inquiries following the news that President Donald Trump has contracted COVID-19.



a man holding a glass of wine: FILE PHOTO: House Financial Services Committee holds hearing on oversight of the Treasury Department's and Federal Reserve's coronavirus response on Capitol Hill in Washington


© Reuters/JOSHUA ROBERTS
FILE PHOTO: House Financial Services Committee holds hearing on oversight of the Treasury Department’s and Federal Reserve’s coronavirus response on Capitol Hill in Washington



a man sitting at a desk in front of a laptop: House Financial Services Committee hearing on oversight of the Treasury Department's and Federal Reserve's coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic response on Capitol Hill in Washington


© Reuters/POOL
House Financial Services Committee hearing on oversight of the Treasury Department’s and Federal Reserve’s coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic response on Capitol Hill in Washington

A Fed spokesperson said in addition that Powell had not been in contact with anyone known to have tested positive for the virus.

Fed officials have been working remotely since the start of the coronavirus pandemic, but Powell has traveled occasionally to Capitol Hill,

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What Twitter is doing to help employees keep working from home forever, from inventing to new lingo to using hand signals on video calls



a group of people walking down a street next to tall buildings: Twitter's headquarters in San Francisco. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images


© Provided by Business Insider
Twitter’s headquarters in San Francisco. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

  • Twitter has been working on “decentralizing” its workforce since 2018, including adding resources and policies to make life easier for remote workers. 
  • Some teams at Twitter have invented hand signals to help employees speak up during virtual meetings, while other teams have invented new phrases to get meetings back on track, according to the Washington Post. 
  • This has come in handy during the coronavirus outbreak: Twitter was the first major tech company to have its workforce start working from home, and CEO Jack Dorsey has told employees they may keep working remotely forever.
  • Twitter has since decided to sublease 100,000 square feet at its San Francisco headquarters and has a policy in place to cut pay for employees who move outside the Bay Area to a less expensive region. 
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Even

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Number of people working from home in UK rises following government U-turn

Video: “UK coronavirus deaths increase to highest weekly figure in six weeks, latest ONS statistics show” (Evening Standard)

“UK coronavirus deaths increase to highest weekly figure in six weeks, latest ONS statistics show”

UP NEXT

UP NEXT

The prime minister’s decision to urge people to work from home has led to a marked drop in commuting, according to the latest official snapshot of the impact of Covid-19.



a laptop computer sitting on top of a table: Photograph: Joe Giddens/PA


© Provided by The Guardian
Photograph: Joe Giddens/PA

In the week following Boris Johnson’s U-turn on previous government advice for people to return to their normal workplaces, 59% of Britons travelled to work compared to a post-crisis 64% the previous week.

Related: Return to work is too late to save city centre stores, warn retailers

Data from the Office for National Statistics showed that the number of people working exclusively from home rose from 21% to 24%. Those neither working from home

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How Silicon Valley is switching up lavish in-office perks to benefit parents working from home



a group of people sitting at a table: Xavier Laine/Getty Images


© Provided by Business Insider
Xavier Laine/Getty Images

  • Silicon Valley has long been known for its lavish employee perks, like on-site fitness classes and free meals. 
  • But as the coronavirus crisis continues to keep workers at home, many tech companies are shifting from fun perks to accommodating benefits — particularly for working parents. 
  • Tech companies like Google, Facebook, Amazon, and Salesforce have started offering benefits like free back-up childcare, extra paid caregiver leave, and subsidized memberships to childcare and tutoring services. 
  • Experts say the emphasis on helping working parents may have been spurred by the pandemic, but will stick around even after life begins to return to normal. 
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

When much of corporate America shifted to remote work six months ago, it initially seemed like it could be to the advantage of working parents. But working from home came with a new slew of

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How parents working from home can ask their boss for more flexibility

  • As the school year begins, many parents are struggling more than ever to balance their work schedules with their kids’ virtual or in-person classes.
  • While most companies are open of COVID-related adjustments, it can be challenging to ask your boss for childcare accommodations.
  • Start by explaining your situation, and come prepared with very specific asks about how to make working from home easier. 
  • Whether it’s breaking your day into time blocks or compromising on deadlines, be firm with your requests but also keep an open mind when discussing solutions with your employer.  
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Rebecca Kallman is the head of brand management at Argonaut, a San Francisco-based advertising agency. She’s also the mom of two very busy kids, ages six and three and a half. When the pandemic hit, she faced many of the same struggles so many other working parents have now that everyone

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You’re Working From Home Wrong. Here’s How to Fix It.

This story was produced in partnership with Hyatt.



a person standing in front of a window


© Provided by Fatherly


COVID-19 kicked us all out of our office spaces and millions of people started working from home. The novelty wore off months ago, but workplaces remain closed across the nation while the frustrations of working from home continue to mount, particularly for parents juggling work and childcare. Interrupted video chats are no longer cute. Missed naps are starting to eat into job security. The walls are closing in and patience is wearing thin. There’s got to be a better way.

There is. It’s time to trade in your tired work from home routine for a memorable work vacation with a Work from Hyatt package, a simple, safe way to get out of the house without giving up the ability for kids to do their schoolwork and adults to do their work work.

The Work from Hyatt program

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